Music

“You feel free behind a microphone”

Quincy Promes has been described as the best rapping footballer by Dutch rapper Sevn Alias. Here the Ajax forward tells Derek Brookman about “a hobby that got a bit out of hand”

PHOTOGRAPHY Lotte Loijenga

How did you get into singing?

I’ve been involved in music since I was a little kid. I built a small studio and it’s an outlet forme. I enjoy making music. You can be so creative with all the programmes that are available. I just enjoy doing it and sometimes I release something.

You make it sound like a hobby on the side, but you’ve received a lot of compliments, notably from Sevn Alias…

Yes, and that’s why I started taking it more seriously and it really got out of hand. It’s nice to have such big names in the rap world say I have talent. It’s something I like to do in my free time, away from football: to listen to or make music in my studio. I listen to everything. My parents played music from Suriname, soul, pop, hip-hop, R&B, everything. Anything with a good rhythm, I listen to.

Do you write your own lyrics?

Yes. Everything.

Quincy Promes’s mask celebration (top); wearing a top from his Mask QP range (above)

In your song Stroggel (Struggle), you talk about the importance of education. Do you see yourself as a role model?

Yes, definitely, with all those guys at the academy who look up to me. I just want to advise them that you should finish school and never regret the choices you make. If I can protect them from that through my music, then that’s a good message to put across.  

And maybe they would sooner listen to an international footballer than to a politician.

Yes, maybe. It’s just fun to inspire people, just like I’m inspired by people.

You’ve had a lot of musical collaborations. Who has been most fun to work with?

I think Frenna, who is one of the biggest names in the Netherlands. When you’re with him, you can see the drive he has; it’s the same drive I have when I’m on the pitch. It’s good to see those two worlds come together. That’s very special. It’s like that with Chivv as well. 

How did you get into singing?

I’ve been involved in music since I was a little kid. I built a small studio and it’s an outlet forme. I enjoy making music. You can be so creative with all the programmes that are available. I just enjoy doing it and sometimes I release something.

You make it sound like a hobby on the side, but you’ve received a lot of compliments, notably from Sevn Alias…

Yes, and that’s why I started taking it more seriously and it really got out of hand. It’s nice to have such big names in the rap world say I have talent. It’s something I like to do in my free time, away from football: to listen to or make music in my studio. I listen to everything. My parents played music from Suriname, soul, pop, hip-hop, R&B, everything. Anything with a good rhythm, I listen to.

Do you write your own lyrics?

Yes. Everything.

Quincy Promes’s mask celebration (top); wearing a top from his Mask QP range (above)

In your song Stroggel (Struggle), you talk about the importance of education. Do you see yourself as a role model?

Yes, definitely, with all those guys at the academy who look up to me. I just want to advise them that you should finish school and never regret the choices you make. If I can protect them from that through my music, then that’s a good message to put across.  

And maybe they would sooner listen to an international footballer than to a politician.

Yes, maybe. It’s just fun to inspire people, just like I’m inspired by people.

You’ve had a lot of musical collaborations. Who has been most fun to work with?

I think Frenna, who is one of the biggest names in the Netherlands. When you’re with him, you can see the drive he has; it’s the same drive I have when I’m on the pitch. It’s good to see those two worlds come together. That’s very special. It’s like that with Chivv as well. 

Read the full story
Sign up now to get access to this and every premium feature on Champions Journal. You will also get access to member-only competitions and offers. And you get all of that completely free!

There’s a photo on Instagram of you with Busta Rhymes. Another collaboration?

No, no, we didn’t make music together. I was in New York and we met and talked a bit.

You’ve also spent a lot of time in the studio with Memphis Depay.

He has the same hobby as me. It was good fun. Memphis is one of my best friends in football and, when we’re together, we make music. That’s a hobby we share. He’s released a new track. It’s great. I hear it before the fans do, of course, and he always asks me for my opinion. I think he’s doing a great job and he’s also getting better at it. I can see him becoming more creative. You feel more free behind that microphone. You can say what you like without being judged. In football, you’re always the centre of attention. So, it’s good to be able to express yourself in your own space. That’s just a great feeling. 

You’ve also got a fashion label called Mask QP, named after your goal celebration – and you’re now selling your own masks.

It’s really bizarre how popular that has become. We sold out within six months. The next collection is on its way. I’ve always been very entrepreneurial and I was just looking around to see what I wanted to do. I’m someone who always wants to look good. So why not make your own clothes? Successfully.

As you say, it’s important to have something outside of football.

When I was younger, it was all about football and you weren’t allowed to think about anything else. But, in these times, it’s important that you also develop yourself business-wise, especially because you know you can’t keep playing forever. You need to have something else that you like doing apart from football because, first of all, you’re a human being. Football will always be number one, but I also like doing other things.

How did you get into singing?

I’ve been involved in music since I was a little kid. I built a small studio and it’s an outlet forme. I enjoy making music. You can be so creative with all the programmes that are available. I just enjoy doing it and sometimes I release something.

You make it sound like a hobby on the side, but you’ve received a lot of compliments, notably from Sevn Alias…

Yes, and that’s why I started taking it more seriously and it really got out of hand. It’s nice to have such big names in the rap world say I have talent. It’s something I like to do in my free time, away from football: to listen to or make music in my studio. I listen to everything. My parents played music from Suriname, soul, pop, hip-hop, R&B, everything. Anything with a good rhythm, I listen to.

Do you write your own lyrics?

Yes. Everything.

Quincy Promes’s mask celebration (top); wearing a top from his Mask QP range (above)

In your song Stroggel (Struggle), you talk about the importance of education. Do you see yourself as a role model?

Yes, definitely, with all those guys at the academy who look up to me. I just want to advise them that you should finish school and never regret the choices you make. If I can protect them from that through my music, then that’s a good message to put across.  

And maybe they would sooner listen to an international footballer than to a politician.

Yes, maybe. It’s just fun to inspire people, just like I’m inspired by people.

You’ve had a lot of musical collaborations. Who has been most fun to work with?

I think Frenna, who is one of the biggest names in the Netherlands. When you’re with him, you can see the drive he has; it’s the same drive I have when I’m on the pitch. It’s good to see those two worlds come together. That’s very special. It’s like that with Chivv as well. 

“You feel free behind a microphone”
Music

“You feel free behind a microphone”

Quincy Promes has been described as the best rapping footballer by Dutch rapper Sevn Alias. Here the Ajax forward tells Derek Brookman about “a hobby that got a bit out of hand”

PHOTOGRAPHY Lotte Loijenga

How did you get into singing?

I’ve been involved in music since I was a little kid. I built a small studio and it’s an outlet forme. I enjoy making music. You can be so creative with all the programmes that are available. I just enjoy doing it and sometimes I release something.

You make it sound like a hobby on the side, but you’ve received a lot of compliments, notably from Sevn Alias…

Yes, and that’s why I started taking it more seriously and it really got out of hand. It’s nice to have such big names in the rap world say I have talent. It’s something I like to do in my free time, away from football: to listen to or make music in my studio. I listen to everything. My parents played music from Suriname, soul, pop, hip-hop, R&B, everything. Anything with a good rhythm, I listen to.

Do you write your own lyrics?

Yes. Everything.

Quincy Promes’s mask celebration (top); wearing a top from his Mask QP range (above)

In your song Stroggel (Struggle), you talk about the importance of education. Do you see yourself as a role model?

Yes, definitely, with all those guys at the academy who look up to me. I just want to advise them that you should finish school and never regret the choices you make. If I can protect them from that through my music, then that’s a good message to put across.  

And maybe they would sooner listen to an international footballer than to a politician.

Yes, maybe. It’s just fun to inspire people, just like I’m inspired by people.

You’ve had a lot of musical collaborations. Who has been most fun to work with?

I think Frenna, who is one of the biggest names in the Netherlands. When you’re with him, you can see the drive he has; it’s the same drive I have when I’m on the pitch. It’s good to see those two worlds come together. That’s very special. It’s like that with Chivv as well. 

Penalty Pedigree

Etiam erat velit scelerisque in dictum non. Dictum non consectetur a erat nam at. Scelerisque felis imperdiet proin fermentum leo. Nibh tortor id aliquet lectus proin nibh nisl. Nulla at volutpat diam ut venenatis. At urna condimentum mattis pellentesque id nibh tortor id aliquet. Leo a diam sollicitudin tempor id eu nisl nunc mi. Dui vivamus arcu felis bibendum ut. Pharetra convallis posuere morbi leo urna molestie. Adipiscing at in tellus integer feugiat scelerisque. In arcu cursus euismod quis. Dictum non consectetur a erat nam at lectus urna duis. Facilisi nullam vehicula ipsum a arcu cursus. At tempor commodo ullamcorper a lacus vestibulum sed arcu non. Ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur adipiscing elit pellentesque habitant. Vitae sapien pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus. Eget nullam non nisi est sit amet facilisis. Ipsum consequat nisl vel pretium lectus quam. Elit sed vulputate mi sit amet mauris commodo quis. Pretium fusce id velit ut tortor pretium viverra suspendisse potenti.

How did you get into singing?

I’ve been involved in music since I was a little kid. I built a small studio and it’s an outlet forme. I enjoy making music. You can be so creative with all the programmes that are available. I just enjoy doing it and sometimes I release something.

You make it sound like a hobby on the side, but you’ve received a lot of compliments, notably from Sevn Alias…

Yes, and that’s why I started taking it more seriously and it really got out of hand. It’s nice to have such big names in the rap world say I have talent. It’s something I like to do in my free time, away from football: to listen to or make music in my studio. I listen to everything. My parents played music from Suriname, soul, pop, hip-hop, R&B, everything. Anything with a good rhythm, I listen to.

Do you write your own lyrics?

Yes. Everything.

Quincy Promes’s mask celebration (top); wearing a top from his Mask QP range (above)

In your song Stroggel (Struggle), you talk about the importance of education. Do you see yourself as a role model?

Yes, definitely, with all those guys at the academy who look up to me. I just want to advise them that you should finish school and never regret the choices you make. If I can protect them from that through my music, then that’s a good message to put across.  

And maybe they would sooner listen to an international footballer than to a politician.

Yes, maybe. It’s just fun to inspire people, just like I’m inspired by people.

You’ve had a lot of musical collaborations. Who has been most fun to work with?

I think Frenna, who is one of the biggest names in the Netherlands. When you’re with him, you can see the drive he has; it’s the same drive I have when I’m on the pitch. It’s good to see those two worlds come together. That’s very special. It’s like that with Chivv as well. 

Read the full story
Sign up now to get access to this and every premium feature on Champions Journal. You will also get access to member-only competitions and offers. And you get all of that completely free!

There’s a photo on Instagram of you with Busta Rhymes. Another collaboration?

No, no, we didn’t make music together. I was in New York and we met and talked a bit.

You’ve also spent a lot of time in the studio with Memphis Depay.

He has the same hobby as me. It was good fun. Memphis is one of my best friends in football and, when we’re together, we make music. That’s a hobby we share. He’s released a new track. It’s great. I hear it before the fans do, of course, and he always asks me for my opinion. I think he’s doing a great job and he’s also getting better at it. I can see him becoming more creative. You feel more free behind that microphone. You can say what you like without being judged. In football, you’re always the centre of attention. So, it’s good to be able to express yourself in your own space. That’s just a great feeling. 

You’ve also got a fashion label called Mask QP, named after your goal celebration – and you’re now selling your own masks.

It’s really bizarre how popular that has become. We sold out within six months. The next collection is on its way. I’ve always been very entrepreneurial and I was just looking around to see what I wanted to do. I’m someone who always wants to look good. So why not make your own clothes? Successfully.

As you say, it’s important to have something outside of football.

When I was younger, it was all about football and you weren’t allowed to think about anything else. But, in these times, it’s important that you also develop yourself business-wise, especially because you know you can’t keep playing forever. You need to have something else that you like doing apart from football because, first of all, you’re a human being. Football will always be number one, but I also like doing other things.

How did you get into singing?

I’ve been involved in music since I was a little kid. I built a small studio and it’s an outlet forme. I enjoy making music. You can be so creative with all the programmes that are available. I just enjoy doing it and sometimes I release something.

You make it sound like a hobby on the side, but you’ve received a lot of compliments, notably from Sevn Alias…

Yes, and that’s why I started taking it more seriously and it really got out of hand. It’s nice to have such big names in the rap world say I have talent. It’s something I like to do in my free time, away from football: to listen to or make music in my studio. I listen to everything. My parents played music from Suriname, soul, pop, hip-hop, R&B, everything. Anything with a good rhythm, I listen to.

Do you write your own lyrics?

Yes. Everything.

Quincy Promes’s mask celebration (top); wearing a top from his Mask QP range (above)

In your song Stroggel (Struggle), you talk about the importance of education. Do you see yourself as a role model?

Yes, definitely, with all those guys at the academy who look up to me. I just want to advise them that you should finish school and never regret the choices you make. If I can protect them from that through my music, then that’s a good message to put across.  

And maybe they would sooner listen to an international footballer than to a politician.

Yes, maybe. It’s just fun to inspire people, just like I’m inspired by people.

You’ve had a lot of musical collaborations. Who has been most fun to work with?

I think Frenna, who is one of the biggest names in the Netherlands. When you’re with him, you can see the drive he has; it’s the same drive I have when I’m on the pitch. It’s good to see those two worlds come together. That’s very special. It’s like that with Chivv as well. 

Penalty Pedigree

Etiam erat velit scelerisque in dictum non. Dictum non consectetur a erat nam at. Scelerisque felis imperdiet proin fermentum leo. Nibh tortor id aliquet lectus proin nibh nisl. Nulla at volutpat diam ut venenatis. At urna condimentum mattis pellentesque id nibh tortor id aliquet. Leo a diam sollicitudin tempor id eu nisl nunc mi. Dui vivamus arcu felis bibendum ut. Pharetra convallis posuere morbi leo urna molestie. Adipiscing at in tellus integer feugiat scelerisque. In arcu cursus euismod quis. Dictum non consectetur a erat nam at lectus urna duis. Facilisi nullam vehicula ipsum a arcu cursus. At tempor commodo ullamcorper a lacus vestibulum sed arcu non. Ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur adipiscing elit pellentesque habitant. Vitae sapien pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus. Eget nullam non nisi est sit amet facilisis. Ipsum consequat nisl vel pretium lectus quam. Elit sed vulputate mi sit amet mauris commodo quis. Pretium fusce id velit ut tortor pretium viverra suspendisse potenti.

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