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Insight

Programme notes

Our design director Ranald Graham is so struck by the elegant Swiss look of the 1961 final programme that the football is almost incidental

I love the cover. The simplified, jagged, geometric map of Europe with shapes echoed in the giant yellow ball work so well. The offset composition of the ball bleeding off the page reminds me of a poster that Josef Müller-Brockmann might design. In fact, this programme is the closest one I’ve seen to the great modernist Swiss Style – clean, stylish, non-sentimental – that's so loved by designers.

It’s pocket size (A5), three-colour printing. Those colours aren’t the red of Benfica, nor the blue and maroon of Barça as you might expect. Instead it’s yellow and black; a nod, perhaps, to local side Young Boys. The programme was, after all, designed and printed in Berne, with the final at the city’s Wankdorf Stadium.

I love the cover. The simplified, jagged, geometric map of Europe with shapes echoed in the giant yellow ball work so well. The offset composition of the ball bleeding off the page reminds me of a poster that Josef Müller-Brockmann might design. In fact, this programme is the closest one I’ve seen to the great modernist Swiss Style – clean, stylish, non-sentimental – that's so loved by designers.

It’s pocket size (A5), three-colour printing. Those colours aren’t the red of Benfica, nor the blue and maroon of Barça as you might expect. Instead it’s yellow and black; a nod, perhaps, to local side Young Boys. The programme was, after all, designed and printed in Berne, with the final at the city’s Wankdorf Stadium.

Read the full story
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The inside pages are simple and elegant. Minimal typography (Akzidenz-Grotesk, or similar), a strong grid, asymmetric, with as much white space as a designer could wish for. The delicate keylines and blind columns would still work in Champions Journal now. This was the golden age of graphics and it still resonates today.

As for the football, the team profiles are fantastic, again in that pared-back Swiss style. There is only space for four players from each team – a four-a-side European Cup final? – despite that abundance of white space throughout. The team line-ups and route-to-the-final results are so minimal that they almost look like scientific formulas.

Most of the adverts are also super-stylish. And if you were in any doubt that this final was played in Switzerland then the back cover gives it away: an etching illustration of a bar of Toblerone on top of the Matterhorn. It wouldn’t look out of place in a thick wooden frame on the wall of a chalet as you tuck into your fondue. This is the best of Swiss design – 60 years old and still going strong.

I love the cover. The simplified, jagged, geometric map of Europe with shapes echoed in the giant yellow ball work so well. The offset composition of the ball bleeding off the page reminds me of a poster that Josef Müller-Brockmann might design. In fact, this programme is the closest one I’ve seen to the great modernist Swiss Style – clean, stylish, non-sentimental – that's so loved by designers.

It’s pocket size (A5), three-colour printing. Those colours aren’t the red of Benfica, nor the blue and maroon of Barça as you might expect. Instead it’s yellow and black; a nod, perhaps, to local side Young Boys. The programme was, after all, designed and printed in Berne, with the final at the city’s Wankdorf Stadium.

Programme notes
Insight

Programme notes

Our design director Ranald Graham is so struck by the elegant Swiss look of the 1961 final programme that the football is almost incidental

I love the cover. The simplified, jagged, geometric map of Europe with shapes echoed in the giant yellow ball work so well. The offset composition of the ball bleeding off the page reminds me of a poster that Josef Müller-Brockmann might design. In fact, this programme is the closest one I’ve seen to the great modernist Swiss Style – clean, stylish, non-sentimental – that's so loved by designers.

It’s pocket size (A5), three-colour printing. Those colours aren’t the red of Benfica, nor the blue and maroon of Barça as you might expect. Instead it’s yellow and black; a nod, perhaps, to local side Young Boys. The programme was, after all, designed and printed in Berne, with the final at the city’s Wankdorf Stadium.

Penalty Pedigree

Etiam erat velit scelerisque in dictum non. Dictum non consectetur a erat nam at. Scelerisque felis imperdiet proin fermentum leo. Nibh tortor id aliquet lectus proin nibh nisl. Nulla at volutpat diam ut venenatis. At urna condimentum mattis pellentesque id nibh tortor id aliquet. Leo a diam sollicitudin tempor id eu nisl nunc mi. Dui vivamus arcu felis bibendum ut. Pharetra convallis posuere morbi leo urna molestie. Adipiscing at in tellus integer feugiat scelerisque. In arcu cursus euismod quis. Dictum non consectetur a erat nam at lectus urna duis. Facilisi nullam vehicula ipsum a arcu cursus. At tempor commodo ullamcorper a lacus vestibulum sed arcu non. Ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur adipiscing elit pellentesque habitant. Vitae sapien pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus. Eget nullam non nisi est sit amet facilisis. Ipsum consequat nisl vel pretium lectus quam. Elit sed vulputate mi sit amet mauris commodo quis. Pretium fusce id velit ut tortor pretium viverra suspendisse potenti.

I love the cover. The simplified, jagged, geometric map of Europe with shapes echoed in the giant yellow ball work so well. The offset composition of the ball bleeding off the page reminds me of a poster that Josef Müller-Brockmann might design. In fact, this programme is the closest one I’ve seen to the great modernist Swiss Style – clean, stylish, non-sentimental – that's so loved by designers.

It’s pocket size (A5), three-colour printing. Those colours aren’t the red of Benfica, nor the blue and maroon of Barça as you might expect. Instead it’s yellow and black; a nod, perhaps, to local side Young Boys. The programme was, after all, designed and printed in Berne, with the final at the city’s Wankdorf Stadium.

Read the full story
Sign up now to get access to this and every premium feature on Champions Journal. You will also get access to member-only competitions and offers. And you get all of that completely free!

The inside pages are simple and elegant. Minimal typography (Akzidenz-Grotesk, or similar), a strong grid, asymmetric, with as much white space as a designer could wish for. The delicate keylines and blind columns would still work in Champions Journal now. This was the golden age of graphics and it still resonates today.

As for the football, the team profiles are fantastic, again in that pared-back Swiss style. There is only space for four players from each team – a four-a-side European Cup final? – despite that abundance of white space throughout. The team line-ups and route-to-the-final results are so minimal that they almost look like scientific formulas.

Most of the adverts are also super-stylish. And if you were in any doubt that this final was played in Switzerland then the back cover gives it away: an etching illustration of a bar of Toblerone on top of the Matterhorn. It wouldn’t look out of place in a thick wooden frame on the wall of a chalet as you tuck into your fondue. This is the best of Swiss design – 60 years old and still going strong.

I love the cover. The simplified, jagged, geometric map of Europe with shapes echoed in the giant yellow ball work so well. The offset composition of the ball bleeding off the page reminds me of a poster that Josef Müller-Brockmann might design. In fact, this programme is the closest one I’ve seen to the great modernist Swiss Style – clean, stylish, non-sentimental – that's so loved by designers.

It’s pocket size (A5), three-colour printing. Those colours aren’t the red of Benfica, nor the blue and maroon of Barça as you might expect. Instead it’s yellow and black; a nod, perhaps, to local side Young Boys. The programme was, after all, designed and printed in Berne, with the final at the city’s Wankdorf Stadium.

Penalty Pedigree

Etiam erat velit scelerisque in dictum non. Dictum non consectetur a erat nam at. Scelerisque felis imperdiet proin fermentum leo. Nibh tortor id aliquet lectus proin nibh nisl. Nulla at volutpat diam ut venenatis. At urna condimentum mattis pellentesque id nibh tortor id aliquet. Leo a diam sollicitudin tempor id eu nisl nunc mi. Dui vivamus arcu felis bibendum ut. Pharetra convallis posuere morbi leo urna molestie. Adipiscing at in tellus integer feugiat scelerisque. In arcu cursus euismod quis. Dictum non consectetur a erat nam at lectus urna duis. Facilisi nullam vehicula ipsum a arcu cursus. At tempor commodo ullamcorper a lacus vestibulum sed arcu non. Ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur adipiscing elit pellentesque habitant. Vitae sapien pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus. Eget nullam non nisi est sit amet facilisis. Ipsum consequat nisl vel pretium lectus quam. Elit sed vulputate mi sit amet mauris commodo quis. Pretium fusce id velit ut tortor pretium viverra suspendisse potenti.

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