History

Programme notes

From marching bands to the trains to Marylebone, Ranald Graham enjoys the Britishness of the 1963 final programme

WORDS Ranald Graham

1963. Quite a year. The Beatles’ debut album, Everton winning the league, the Great Train Robbery and the FA’s centenary – as the cover of the European Cup final programme proudly proclaims. Benfica v Milan, Eusébio v Maldini, Coluna v Rivera – all spelled out on 16 pages so thin you could roll a cigarette with them.

The cover feels very British; factual, technical, quite staid. It is informative, but personality comes through the illustrations, all done using red-and-blue ink, of course. This is the era of Ladybird books and Roy of the Rovers, when illustration was king. I love the centred trophy (the original version, replaced four years after this) which is plonked on top of an aerial view of the old Wembley. The two images don’t interact in any way, but it just kind of works.

Inside it feels ancient, like an old newspaper. Single-colour printing; tiny full-width justified type with tight leading; decorative borders; club badges used as drop caps; an oval vignette headshot of the UEFA president; a mix of gothic bold caps and Bodoni.

Swinging Sixties London is just around the corner, but this musical entertainment is proudly old school – marching band complete with times, songs and performers. The team line-ups page is great; legendary names, and a wonderful ball illustration which centres everything. Simple and effective. It’s just a shame they had to squeeze in a box telling us about the special train service to Marylebone. But maybe that’s what makes it special. It all feels so British and proper. Milan won, by the way, 2-1, José Altafini scoring twice.

1963. Quite a year. The Beatles’ debut album, Everton winning the league, the Great Train Robbery and the FA’s centenary – as the cover of the European Cup final programme proudly proclaims. Benfica v Milan, Eusébio v Maldini, Coluna v Rivera – all spelled out on 16 pages so thin you could roll a cigarette with them.

The cover feels very British; factual, technical, quite staid. It is informative, but personality comes through the illustrations, all done using red-and-blue ink, of course. This is the era of Ladybird books and Roy of the Rovers, when illustration was king. I love the centred trophy (the original version, replaced four years after this) which is plonked on top of an aerial view of the old Wembley. The two images don’t interact in any way, but it just kind of works.

Inside it feels ancient, like an old newspaper. Single-colour printing; tiny full-width justified type with tight leading; decorative borders; club badges used as drop caps; an oval vignette headshot of the UEFA president; a mix of gothic bold caps and Bodoni.

Swinging Sixties London is just around the corner, but this musical entertainment is proudly old school – marching band complete with times, songs and performers. The team line-ups page is great; legendary names, and a wonderful ball illustration which centres everything. Simple and effective. It’s just a shame they had to squeeze in a box telling us about the special train service to Marylebone. But maybe that’s what makes it special. It all feels so British and proper. Milan won, by the way, 2-1, José Altafini scoring twice.

Read the full story
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1963. Quite a year. The Beatles’ debut album, Everton winning the league, the Great Train Robbery and the FA’s centenary – as the cover of the European Cup final programme proudly proclaims. Benfica v Milan, Eusébio v Maldini, Coluna v Rivera – all spelled out on 16 pages so thin you could roll a cigarette with them.

The cover feels very British; factual, technical, quite staid. It is informative, but personality comes through the illustrations, all done using red-and-blue ink, of course. This is the era of Ladybird books and Roy of the Rovers, when illustration was king. I love the centred trophy (the original version, replaced four years after this) which is plonked on top of an aerial view of the old Wembley. The two images don’t interact in any way, but it just kind of works.

Inside it feels ancient, like an old newspaper. Single-colour printing; tiny full-width justified type with tight leading; decorative borders; club badges used as drop caps; an oval vignette headshot of the UEFA president; a mix of gothic bold caps and Bodoni.

Swinging Sixties London is just around the corner, but this musical entertainment is proudly old school – marching band complete with times, songs and performers. The team line-ups page is great; legendary names, and a wonderful ball illustration which centres everything. Simple and effective. It’s just a shame they had to squeeze in a box telling us about the special train service to Marylebone. But maybe that’s what makes it special. It all feels so British and proper. Milan won, by the way, 2-1, José Altafini scoring twice.

Programme notes
History

Programme notes

From marching bands to the trains to Marylebone, Ranald Graham enjoys the Britishness of the 1963 final programme

WORDS Ranald Graham

1963. Quite a year. The Beatles’ debut album, Everton winning the league, the Great Train Robbery and the FA’s centenary – as the cover of the European Cup final programme proudly proclaims. Benfica v Milan, Eusébio v Maldini, Coluna v Rivera – all spelled out on 16 pages so thin you could roll a cigarette with them.

The cover feels very British; factual, technical, quite staid. It is informative, but personality comes through the illustrations, all done using red-and-blue ink, of course. This is the era of Ladybird books and Roy of the Rovers, when illustration was king. I love the centred trophy (the original version, replaced four years after this) which is plonked on top of an aerial view of the old Wembley. The two images don’t interact in any way, but it just kind of works.

Inside it feels ancient, like an old newspaper. Single-colour printing; tiny full-width justified type with tight leading; decorative borders; club badges used as drop caps; an oval vignette headshot of the UEFA president; a mix of gothic bold caps and Bodoni.

Swinging Sixties London is just around the corner, but this musical entertainment is proudly old school – marching band complete with times, songs and performers. The team line-ups page is great; legendary names, and a wonderful ball illustration which centres everything. Simple and effective. It’s just a shame they had to squeeze in a box telling us about the special train service to Marylebone. But maybe that’s what makes it special. It all feels so British and proper. Milan won, by the way, 2-1, José Altafini scoring twice.

Penalty Pedigree

Etiam erat velit scelerisque in dictum non. Dictum non consectetur a erat nam at. Scelerisque felis imperdiet proin fermentum leo. Nibh tortor id aliquet lectus proin nibh nisl. Nulla at volutpat diam ut venenatis. At urna condimentum mattis pellentesque id nibh tortor id aliquet. Leo a diam sollicitudin tempor id eu nisl nunc mi. Dui vivamus arcu felis bibendum ut. Pharetra convallis posuere morbi leo urna molestie. Adipiscing at in tellus integer feugiat scelerisque. In arcu cursus euismod quis. Dictum non consectetur a erat nam at lectus urna duis. Facilisi nullam vehicula ipsum a arcu cursus. At tempor commodo ullamcorper a lacus vestibulum sed arcu non. Ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur adipiscing elit pellentesque habitant. Vitae sapien pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus. Eget nullam non nisi est sit amet facilisis. Ipsum consequat nisl vel pretium lectus quam. Elit sed vulputate mi sit amet mauris commodo quis. Pretium fusce id velit ut tortor pretium viverra suspendisse potenti.

1963. Quite a year. The Beatles’ debut album, Everton winning the league, the Great Train Robbery and the FA’s centenary – as the cover of the European Cup final programme proudly proclaims. Benfica v Milan, Eusébio v Maldini, Coluna v Rivera – all spelled out on 16 pages so thin you could roll a cigarette with them.

The cover feels very British; factual, technical, quite staid. It is informative, but personality comes through the illustrations, all done using red-and-blue ink, of course. This is the era of Ladybird books and Roy of the Rovers, when illustration was king. I love the centred trophy (the original version, replaced four years after this) which is plonked on top of an aerial view of the old Wembley. The two images don’t interact in any way, but it just kind of works.

Inside it feels ancient, like an old newspaper. Single-colour printing; tiny full-width justified type with tight leading; decorative borders; club badges used as drop caps; an oval vignette headshot of the UEFA president; a mix of gothic bold caps and Bodoni.

Swinging Sixties London is just around the corner, but this musical entertainment is proudly old school – marching band complete with times, songs and performers. The team line-ups page is great; legendary names, and a wonderful ball illustration which centres everything. Simple and effective. It’s just a shame they had to squeeze in a box telling us about the special train service to Marylebone. But maybe that’s what makes it special. It all feels so British and proper. Milan won, by the way, 2-1, José Altafini scoring twice.

Read the full story
Sign up now to get access to this and every premium feature on Champions Journal. You will also get access to member-only competitions and offers. And you get all of that completely free!

1963. Quite a year. The Beatles’ debut album, Everton winning the league, the Great Train Robbery and the FA’s centenary – as the cover of the European Cup final programme proudly proclaims. Benfica v Milan, Eusébio v Maldini, Coluna v Rivera – all spelled out on 16 pages so thin you could roll a cigarette with them.

The cover feels very British; factual, technical, quite staid. It is informative, but personality comes through the illustrations, all done using red-and-blue ink, of course. This is the era of Ladybird books and Roy of the Rovers, when illustration was king. I love the centred trophy (the original version, replaced four years after this) which is plonked on top of an aerial view of the old Wembley. The two images don’t interact in any way, but it just kind of works.

Inside it feels ancient, like an old newspaper. Single-colour printing; tiny full-width justified type with tight leading; decorative borders; club badges used as drop caps; an oval vignette headshot of the UEFA president; a mix of gothic bold caps and Bodoni.

Swinging Sixties London is just around the corner, but this musical entertainment is proudly old school – marching band complete with times, songs and performers. The team line-ups page is great; legendary names, and a wonderful ball illustration which centres everything. Simple and effective. It’s just a shame they had to squeeze in a box telling us about the special train service to Marylebone. But maybe that’s what makes it special. It all feels so British and proper. Milan won, by the way, 2-1, José Altafini scoring twice.

Penalty Pedigree

Etiam erat velit scelerisque in dictum non. Dictum non consectetur a erat nam at. Scelerisque felis imperdiet proin fermentum leo. Nibh tortor id aliquet lectus proin nibh nisl. Nulla at volutpat diam ut venenatis. At urna condimentum mattis pellentesque id nibh tortor id aliquet. Leo a diam sollicitudin tempor id eu nisl nunc mi. Dui vivamus arcu felis bibendum ut. Pharetra convallis posuere morbi leo urna molestie. Adipiscing at in tellus integer feugiat scelerisque. In arcu cursus euismod quis. Dictum non consectetur a erat nam at lectus urna duis. Facilisi nullam vehicula ipsum a arcu cursus. At tempor commodo ullamcorper a lacus vestibulum sed arcu non. Ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur adipiscing elit pellentesque habitant. Vitae sapien pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus. Eget nullam non nisi est sit amet facilisis. Ipsum consequat nisl vel pretium lectus quam. Elit sed vulputate mi sit amet mauris commodo quis. Pretium fusce id velit ut tortor pretium viverra suspendisse potenti.

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