Interview

"We give our all"

Ahead of their round of 16 clash with Manchester City, Sporting captain Sebastián Coates sits down to discuss Lisbon, Liverpool and his love of South American cuisine

You have been playing at Sporting for six years. What’s special about Lisbon?

Since the day I arrived I’ve been treated very well by the club, both by the club staff and the Portuguese supporters. The weather is fantastic and it’s like this all year round. It may not be as big a city as London or Paris, but it’s charming and the club is strongly connected to the city. As someone from Uruguay, this city reminds me of Montevideo.

You’re known for your fight and determination to help your team. What does that mean to you?

I think that has to do with the way Uruguayan people understand football. We try to never give up, to give our all for the team until the very last minute. That’s what makes Uruguayan football different: never surrendering and never giving up.

You played in Uruguay for Club Nacional de Football, then England for Liverpool and Sunderland, and now here. How do you reflect on that journey?

Well, obviously, Uruguay is my home country. My family and friends are there, I have always been a fan of Nacional and I was lucky enough to play for that club. After that I went to England and I arrived at a club with an incredible history, Liverpool. It perhaps took me a long time to adapt and get to know the club. Then I moved to Sunderland, a club that also has a strong connection to its city. Maybe in those two clubs I didn’t have the chances that I have had both at Nacional and Sporting. However, Liverpool was my first opportunity to play abroad and I learned a lot: the culture shock, living on my own, depending on myself and not on my family. All of that was very important.

What about food? With Portuguese cuisine being so different to Uruguay and England, which dishes do you miss the most from each place?

Well, obviously, in Uruguay the main food is meat. Luckily I am able to find lots of meat here in Portugal, very similar to Uruguay. And maybe that helps me to not miss it as much. Here we eat a lot of fish and it’s amazing. In England there are other traditions and maybe I don’t share them as much. Fish and chips is a very famous dish over there and, well, as an athlete, that's not one you would have too often.

If someone only had a day to spend in Montevideo, what would you recommend they do?

First you’d have to try our meat! It’s one of our traditions. Then we have many tourist spots: the Rambla, and obviously for football lovers there’s the historic Estadio Centenario Stadium. And I support Club Nacional, so there’s Gran Parque Central, one of the first stadiums where the first World Cup was held. Football lovers and tourists in general have very beautiful places to visit. 

What about maté tea? We hear you drink a lot of it…

Yes, from morning to evening. In our culture, perhaps it’s not about drinking maté itself, but rather about sharing the moment. It’s more about us coming together to chat, to tell each other things under the pretext of drinking maté.

Have you managed to convert any teammates to it yet?

A few of them have tried it but it’s a challenging flavour if you’re not used to it. You have to have patience. I always want them to like it the first time they try it, but it’s difficult!

You have been playing at Sporting for six years. What’s special about Lisbon?

Since the day I arrived I’ve been treated very well by the club, both by the club staff and the Portuguese supporters. The weather is fantastic and it’s like this all year round. It may not be as big a city as London or Paris, but it’s charming and the club is strongly connected to the city. As someone from Uruguay, this city reminds me of Montevideo.

You’re known for your fight and determination to help your team. What does that mean to you?

I think that has to do with the way Uruguayan people understand football. We try to never give up, to give our all for the team until the very last minute. That’s what makes Uruguayan football different: never surrendering and never giving up.

You played in Uruguay for Club Nacional de Football, then England for Liverpool and Sunderland, and now here. How do you reflect on that journey?

Well, obviously, Uruguay is my home country. My family and friends are there, I have always been a fan of Nacional and I was lucky enough to play for that club. After that I went to England and I arrived at a club with an incredible history, Liverpool. It perhaps took me a long time to adapt and get to know the club. Then I moved to Sunderland, a club that also has a strong connection to its city. Maybe in those two clubs I didn’t have the chances that I have had both at Nacional and Sporting. However, Liverpool was my first opportunity to play abroad and I learned a lot: the culture shock, living on my own, depending on myself and not on my family. All of that was very important.

What about food? With Portuguese cuisine being so different to Uruguay and England, which dishes do you miss the most from each place?

Well, obviously, in Uruguay the main food is meat. Luckily I am able to find lots of meat here in Portugal, very similar to Uruguay. And maybe that helps me to not miss it as much. Here we eat a lot of fish and it’s amazing. In England there are other traditions and maybe I don’t share them as much. Fish and chips is a very famous dish over there and, well, as an athlete, that's not one you would have too often.

If someone only had a day to spend in Montevideo, what would you recommend they do?

First you’d have to try our meat! It’s one of our traditions. Then we have many tourist spots: the Rambla, and obviously for football lovers there’s the historic Estadio Centenario Stadium. And I support Club Nacional, so there’s Gran Parque Central, one of the first stadiums where the first World Cup was held. Football lovers and tourists in general have very beautiful places to visit. 

What about maté tea? We hear you drink a lot of it…

Yes, from morning to evening. In our culture, perhaps it’s not about drinking maté itself, but rather about sharing the moment. It’s more about us coming together to chat, to tell each other things under the pretext of drinking maté.

Have you managed to convert any teammates to it yet?

A few of them have tried it but it’s a challenging flavour if you’re not used to it. You have to have patience. I always want them to like it the first time they try it, but it’s difficult!

Read the full story
Sign up now to get access to this and every premium feature on Champions Journal. You will also get access to member-only competitions and offers. And you get all of that completely free!

You have been playing at Sporting for six years. What’s special about Lisbon?

Since the day I arrived I’ve been treated very well by the club, both by the club staff and the Portuguese supporters. The weather is fantastic and it’s like this all year round. It may not be as big a city as London or Paris, but it’s charming and the club is strongly connected to the city. As someone from Uruguay, this city reminds me of Montevideo.

You’re known for your fight and determination to help your team. What does that mean to you?

I think that has to do with the way Uruguayan people understand football. We try to never give up, to give our all for the team until the very last minute. That’s what makes Uruguayan football different: never surrendering and never giving up.

You played in Uruguay for Club Nacional de Football, then England for Liverpool and Sunderland, and now here. How do you reflect on that journey?

Well, obviously, Uruguay is my home country. My family and friends are there, I have always been a fan of Nacional and I was lucky enough to play for that club. After that I went to England and I arrived at a club with an incredible history, Liverpool. It perhaps took me a long time to adapt and get to know the club. Then I moved to Sunderland, a club that also has a strong connection to its city. Maybe in those two clubs I didn’t have the chances that I have had both at Nacional and Sporting. However, Liverpool was my first opportunity to play abroad and I learned a lot: the culture shock, living on my own, depending on myself and not on my family. All of that was very important.

What about food? With Portuguese cuisine being so different to Uruguay and England, which dishes do you miss the most from each place?

Well, obviously, in Uruguay the main food is meat. Luckily I am able to find lots of meat here in Portugal, very similar to Uruguay. And maybe that helps me to not miss it as much. Here we eat a lot of fish and it’s amazing. In England there are other traditions and maybe I don’t share them as much. Fish and chips is a very famous dish over there and, well, as an athlete, that's not one you would have too often.

If someone only had a day to spend in Montevideo, what would you recommend they do?

First you’d have to try our meat! It’s one of our traditions. Then we have many tourist spots: the Rambla, and obviously for football lovers there’s the historic Estadio Centenario Stadium. And I support Club Nacional, so there’s Gran Parque Central, one of the first stadiums where the first World Cup was held. Football lovers and tourists in general have very beautiful places to visit. 

What about maté tea? We hear you drink a lot of it…

Yes, from morning to evening. In our culture, perhaps it’s not about drinking maté itself, but rather about sharing the moment. It’s more about us coming together to chat, to tell each other things under the pretext of drinking maté.

Have you managed to convert any teammates to it yet?

A few of them have tried it but it’s a challenging flavour if you’re not used to it. You have to have patience. I always want them to like it the first time they try it, but it’s difficult!

"We give our all"
Interview

"We give our all"

Ahead of their round of 16 clash with Manchester City, Sporting captain Sebastián Coates sits down to discuss Lisbon, Liverpool and his love of South American cuisine

You have been playing at Sporting for six years. What’s special about Lisbon?

Since the day I arrived I’ve been treated very well by the club, both by the club staff and the Portuguese supporters. The weather is fantastic and it’s like this all year round. It may not be as big a city as London or Paris, but it’s charming and the club is strongly connected to the city. As someone from Uruguay, this city reminds me of Montevideo.

You’re known for your fight and determination to help your team. What does that mean to you?

I think that has to do with the way Uruguayan people understand football. We try to never give up, to give our all for the team until the very last minute. That’s what makes Uruguayan football different: never surrendering and never giving up.

You played in Uruguay for Club Nacional de Football, then England for Liverpool and Sunderland, and now here. How do you reflect on that journey?

Well, obviously, Uruguay is my home country. My family and friends are there, I have always been a fan of Nacional and I was lucky enough to play for that club. After that I went to England and I arrived at a club with an incredible history, Liverpool. It perhaps took me a long time to adapt and get to know the club. Then I moved to Sunderland, a club that also has a strong connection to its city. Maybe in those two clubs I didn’t have the chances that I have had both at Nacional and Sporting. However, Liverpool was my first opportunity to play abroad and I learned a lot: the culture shock, living on my own, depending on myself and not on my family. All of that was very important.

What about food? With Portuguese cuisine being so different to Uruguay and England, which dishes do you miss the most from each place?

Well, obviously, in Uruguay the main food is meat. Luckily I am able to find lots of meat here in Portugal, very similar to Uruguay. And maybe that helps me to not miss it as much. Here we eat a lot of fish and it’s amazing. In England there are other traditions and maybe I don’t share them as much. Fish and chips is a very famous dish over there and, well, as an athlete, that's not one you would have too often.

If someone only had a day to spend in Montevideo, what would you recommend they do?

First you’d have to try our meat! It’s one of our traditions. Then we have many tourist spots: the Rambla, and obviously for football lovers there’s the historic Estadio Centenario Stadium. And I support Club Nacional, so there’s Gran Parque Central, one of the first stadiums where the first World Cup was held. Football lovers and tourists in general have very beautiful places to visit. 

What about maté tea? We hear you drink a lot of it…

Yes, from morning to evening. In our culture, perhaps it’s not about drinking maté itself, but rather about sharing the moment. It’s more about us coming together to chat, to tell each other things under the pretext of drinking maté.

Have you managed to convert any teammates to it yet?

A few of them have tried it but it’s a challenging flavour if you’re not used to it. You have to have patience. I always want them to like it the first time they try it, but it’s difficult!

Penalty Pedigree

Etiam erat velit scelerisque in dictum non. Dictum non consectetur a erat nam at. Scelerisque felis imperdiet proin fermentum leo. Nibh tortor id aliquet lectus proin nibh nisl. Nulla at volutpat diam ut venenatis. At urna condimentum mattis pellentesque id nibh tortor id aliquet. Leo a diam sollicitudin tempor id eu nisl nunc mi. Dui vivamus arcu felis bibendum ut. Pharetra convallis posuere morbi leo urna molestie. Adipiscing at in tellus integer feugiat scelerisque. In arcu cursus euismod quis. Dictum non consectetur a erat nam at lectus urna duis. Facilisi nullam vehicula ipsum a arcu cursus. At tempor commodo ullamcorper a lacus vestibulum sed arcu non. Ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur adipiscing elit pellentesque habitant. Vitae sapien pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus. Eget nullam non nisi est sit amet facilisis. Ipsum consequat nisl vel pretium lectus quam. Elit sed vulputate mi sit amet mauris commodo quis. Pretium fusce id velit ut tortor pretium viverra suspendisse potenti.

You have been playing at Sporting for six years. What’s special about Lisbon?

Since the day I arrived I’ve been treated very well by the club, both by the club staff and the Portuguese supporters. The weather is fantastic and it’s like this all year round. It may not be as big a city as London or Paris, but it’s charming and the club is strongly connected to the city. As someone from Uruguay, this city reminds me of Montevideo.

You’re known for your fight and determination to help your team. What does that mean to you?

I think that has to do with the way Uruguayan people understand football. We try to never give up, to give our all for the team until the very last minute. That’s what makes Uruguayan football different: never surrendering and never giving up.

You played in Uruguay for Club Nacional de Football, then England for Liverpool and Sunderland, and now here. How do you reflect on that journey?

Well, obviously, Uruguay is my home country. My family and friends are there, I have always been a fan of Nacional and I was lucky enough to play for that club. After that I went to England and I arrived at a club with an incredible history, Liverpool. It perhaps took me a long time to adapt and get to know the club. Then I moved to Sunderland, a club that also has a strong connection to its city. Maybe in those two clubs I didn’t have the chances that I have had both at Nacional and Sporting. However, Liverpool was my first opportunity to play abroad and I learned a lot: the culture shock, living on my own, depending on myself and not on my family. All of that was very important.

What about food? With Portuguese cuisine being so different to Uruguay and England, which dishes do you miss the most from each place?

Well, obviously, in Uruguay the main food is meat. Luckily I am able to find lots of meat here in Portugal, very similar to Uruguay. And maybe that helps me to not miss it as much. Here we eat a lot of fish and it’s amazing. In England there are other traditions and maybe I don’t share them as much. Fish and chips is a very famous dish over there and, well, as an athlete, that's not one you would have too often.

If someone only had a day to spend in Montevideo, what would you recommend they do?

First you’d have to try our meat! It’s one of our traditions. Then we have many tourist spots: the Rambla, and obviously for football lovers there’s the historic Estadio Centenario Stadium. And I support Club Nacional, so there’s Gran Parque Central, one of the first stadiums where the first World Cup was held. Football lovers and tourists in general have very beautiful places to visit. 

What about maté tea? We hear you drink a lot of it…

Yes, from morning to evening. In our culture, perhaps it’s not about drinking maté itself, but rather about sharing the moment. It’s more about us coming together to chat, to tell each other things under the pretext of drinking maté.

Have you managed to convert any teammates to it yet?

A few of them have tried it but it’s a challenging flavour if you’re not used to it. You have to have patience. I always want them to like it the first time they try it, but it’s difficult!

Read the full story
Sign up now to get access to this and every premium feature on Champions Journal. You will also get access to member-only competitions and offers. And you get all of that completely free!

You have been playing at Sporting for six years. What’s special about Lisbon?

Since the day I arrived I’ve been treated very well by the club, both by the club staff and the Portuguese supporters. The weather is fantastic and it’s like this all year round. It may not be as big a city as London or Paris, but it’s charming and the club is strongly connected to the city. As someone from Uruguay, this city reminds me of Montevideo.

You’re known for your fight and determination to help your team. What does that mean to you?

I think that has to do with the way Uruguayan people understand football. We try to never give up, to give our all for the team until the very last minute. That’s what makes Uruguayan football different: never surrendering and never giving up.

You played in Uruguay for Club Nacional de Football, then England for Liverpool and Sunderland, and now here. How do you reflect on that journey?

Well, obviously, Uruguay is my home country. My family and friends are there, I have always been a fan of Nacional and I was lucky enough to play for that club. After that I went to England and I arrived at a club with an incredible history, Liverpool. It perhaps took me a long time to adapt and get to know the club. Then I moved to Sunderland, a club that also has a strong connection to its city. Maybe in those two clubs I didn’t have the chances that I have had both at Nacional and Sporting. However, Liverpool was my first opportunity to play abroad and I learned a lot: the culture shock, living on my own, depending on myself and not on my family. All of that was very important.

What about food? With Portuguese cuisine being so different to Uruguay and England, which dishes do you miss the most from each place?

Well, obviously, in Uruguay the main food is meat. Luckily I am able to find lots of meat here in Portugal, very similar to Uruguay. And maybe that helps me to not miss it as much. Here we eat a lot of fish and it’s amazing. In England there are other traditions and maybe I don’t share them as much. Fish and chips is a very famous dish over there and, well, as an athlete, that's not one you would have too often.

If someone only had a day to spend in Montevideo, what would you recommend they do?

First you’d have to try our meat! It’s one of our traditions. Then we have many tourist spots: the Rambla, and obviously for football lovers there’s the historic Estadio Centenario Stadium. And I support Club Nacional, so there’s Gran Parque Central, one of the first stadiums where the first World Cup was held. Football lovers and tourists in general have very beautiful places to visit. 

What about maté tea? We hear you drink a lot of it…

Yes, from morning to evening. In our culture, perhaps it’s not about drinking maté itself, but rather about sharing the moment. It’s more about us coming together to chat, to tell each other things under the pretext of drinking maté.

Have you managed to convert any teammates to it yet?

A few of them have tried it but it’s a challenging flavour if you’re not used to it. You have to have patience. I always want them to like it the first time they try it, but it’s difficult!

Penalty Pedigree

Etiam erat velit scelerisque in dictum non. Dictum non consectetur a erat nam at. Scelerisque felis imperdiet proin fermentum leo. Nibh tortor id aliquet lectus proin nibh nisl. Nulla at volutpat diam ut venenatis. At urna condimentum mattis pellentesque id nibh tortor id aliquet. Leo a diam sollicitudin tempor id eu nisl nunc mi. Dui vivamus arcu felis bibendum ut. Pharetra convallis posuere morbi leo urna molestie. Adipiscing at in tellus integer feugiat scelerisque. In arcu cursus euismod quis. Dictum non consectetur a erat nam at lectus urna duis. Facilisi nullam vehicula ipsum a arcu cursus. At tempor commodo ullamcorper a lacus vestibulum sed arcu non. Ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur adipiscing elit pellentesque habitant. Vitae sapien pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus. Eget nullam non nisi est sit amet facilisis. Ipsum consequat nisl vel pretium lectus quam. Elit sed vulputate mi sit amet mauris commodo quis. Pretium fusce id velit ut tortor pretium viverra suspendisse potenti.

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