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Interview

Passion and glory

Daichi Kamada is thriving off the fervour of Frankfurt’s supporters as he revels in the opportunity to play Champions League football

WORDS Chris Burke

Given that he lists “drinking coffee” as one of his few hobbies, it’s probably for the best that Daichi Kamada is very good at football. The Frankfurt midfielder enjoys the simpler things in life, but don’t get the mistaken impression that he lacks a taste for excitement. Kamada’s talents recently took him to the World Cup with Japan, yet he could not be happier than in the cauldron of the European game – and feeding off the raw energy of Frankfurt’s supporters. 

“The World Cup has more of a festival atmosphere,” says the 26-year-old, Japan having reached the last 16 in Qatar. “You’re able to have a conversation in the stadium during matches. Coming back to Frankfurt, I’m reminded of why I love playing in such a passionate setting. The top tiers of England and Germany are probably the only places you can experience playing in front of such crowds, so I feel really blessed to play here.”

Kamada joined the Eagles straight from J1 League side Sagan Tosu in 2017, and he is still in awe of the difference in fan cultures. “In Europe, the crowd will react noticeably to every individual play. Especially here in Germany, where the stadium will beat full capacity for every match. Our supporters in Frankfurt are especially passionate, and we’ll have crowds in the tens of thousands even for friendlies against fifth-tier clubs. You don’t see support on that level in Japan.

Daichi Kamada has been relishing his Champions League adventure (top); Winning last season’s Europa League gave Kamada a taste for the big stage

Knockabouts with amateur teams might get the juices flowing, but that scarcely compares to the atmosphere at European games – and Kamada has become accustomed to such high-stakes encounters in recent times. First came Frankfurt’s run to the Europa League title last season, the No15 chipping in with five goals before converting his penalty in the shoot-out defeat of Rangers in the final.

Victory in Seville secured Frankfurt a place in this season’s Champions League, and fulfilled a longheld ambition for Kamada. “It’s the reason I came to Europe and my dream is the same,” he says. “I always wanted to play for a team that has a chance of winning the Champions League.” 

Frankfurt have impressed in their first tilt at the European Cup since they lost the epic 1960 final 7-3 to Real Madrid. The Eagles finished runners-up to Tottenham Hotspur in Group D, with Kamada contributing three goals along the way – including a poignant opener in their 3-2 loss at Spurs. “It was the day I heard that my best friend’s mother had passed away,” he says. “He asked me to score a goal, and I managed it.”

He’ll need to summon up goals with the same willpower for the second leg on Frankfurt’s tie with Napoli, with the Italian side leading 2-0 at the halfway stage on the tie. “They’re definitely the strongest team in Serie A,” says Kamada. But if his side does manage to pull off an impressive comeback in the second leg, where better to celebrate with a good cup of coffee than in Italy?

Given that he lists “drinking coffee” as one of his few hobbies, it’s probably for the best that Daichi Kamada is very good at football. The Frankfurt midfielder enjoys the simpler things in life, but don’t get the mistaken impression that he lacks a taste for excitement. Kamada’s talents recently took him to the World Cup with Japan, yet he could not be happier than in the cauldron of the European game – and feeding off the raw energy of Frankfurt’s supporters. 

“The World Cup has more of a festival atmosphere,” says the 26-year-old, Japan having reached the last 16 in Qatar. “You’re able to have a conversation in the stadium during matches. Coming back to Frankfurt, I’m reminded of why I love playing in such a passionate setting. The top tiers of England and Germany are probably the only places you can experience playing in front of such crowds, so I feel really blessed to play here.”

Kamada joined the Eagles straight from J1 League side Sagan Tosu in 2017, and he is still in awe of the difference in fan cultures. “In Europe, the crowd will react noticeably to every individual play. Especially here in Germany, where the stadium will beat full capacity for every match. Our supporters in Frankfurt are especially passionate, and we’ll have crowds in the tens of thousands even for friendlies against fifth-tier clubs. You don’t see support on that level in Japan.

Daichi Kamada has been relishing his Champions League adventure (top); Winning last season’s Europa League gave Kamada a taste for the big stage

Knockabouts with amateur teams might get the juices flowing, but that scarcely compares to the atmosphere at European games – and Kamada has become accustomed to such high-stakes encounters in recent times. First came Frankfurt’s run to the Europa League title last season, the No15 chipping in with five goals before converting his penalty in the shoot-out defeat of Rangers in the final.

Victory in Seville secured Frankfurt a place in this season’s Champions League, and fulfilled a longheld ambition for Kamada. “It’s the reason I came to Europe and my dream is the same,” he says. “I always wanted to play for a team that has a chance of winning the Champions League.” 

Frankfurt have impressed in their first tilt at the European Cup since they lost the epic 1960 final 7-3 to Real Madrid. The Eagles finished runners-up to Tottenham Hotspur in Group D, with Kamada contributing three goals along the way – including a poignant opener in their 3-2 loss at Spurs. “It was the day I heard that my best friend’s mother had passed away,” he says. “He asked me to score a goal, and I managed it.”

He’ll need to summon up goals with the same willpower for the second leg on Frankfurt’s tie with Napoli, with the Italian side leading 2-0 at the halfway stage on the tie. “They’re definitely the strongest team in Serie A,” says Kamada. But if his side does manage to pull off an impressive comeback in the second leg, where better to celebrate with a good cup of coffee than in Italy?

Read the full story
Sign up now to get access to this and every premium feature on Champions Journal. You will also get access to member-only competitions and offers. And you get all of that completely free!

Given that he lists “drinking coffee” as one of his few hobbies, it’s probably for the best that Daichi Kamada is very good at football. The Frankfurt midfielder enjoys the simpler things in life, but don’t get the mistaken impression that he lacks a taste for excitement. Kamada’s talents recently took him to the World Cup with Japan, yet he could not be happier than in the cauldron of the European game – and feeding off the raw energy of Frankfurt’s supporters. 

“The World Cup has more of a festival atmosphere,” says the 26-year-old, Japan having reached the last 16 in Qatar. “You’re able to have a conversation in the stadium during matches. Coming back to Frankfurt, I’m reminded of why I love playing in such a passionate setting. The top tiers of England and Germany are probably the only places you can experience playing in front of such crowds, so I feel really blessed to play here.”

Kamada joined the Eagles straight from J1 League side Sagan Tosu in 2017, and he is still in awe of the difference in fan cultures. “In Europe, the crowd will react noticeably to every individual play. Especially here in Germany, where the stadium will beat full capacity for every match. Our supporters in Frankfurt are especially passionate, and we’ll have crowds in the tens of thousands even for friendlies against fifth-tier clubs. You don’t see support on that level in Japan.

Daichi Kamada has been relishing his Champions League adventure (top); Winning last season’s Europa League gave Kamada a taste for the big stage

Knockabouts with amateur teams might get the juices flowing, but that scarcely compares to the atmosphere at European games – and Kamada has become accustomed to such high-stakes encounters in recent times. First came Frankfurt’s run to the Europa League title last season, the No15 chipping in with five goals before converting his penalty in the shoot-out defeat of Rangers in the final.

Victory in Seville secured Frankfurt a place in this season’s Champions League, and fulfilled a longheld ambition for Kamada. “It’s the reason I came to Europe and my dream is the same,” he says. “I always wanted to play for a team that has a chance of winning the Champions League.” 

Frankfurt have impressed in their first tilt at the European Cup since they lost the epic 1960 final 7-3 to Real Madrid. The Eagles finished runners-up to Tottenham Hotspur in Group D, with Kamada contributing three goals along the way – including a poignant opener in their 3-2 loss at Spurs. “It was the day I heard that my best friend’s mother had passed away,” he says. “He asked me to score a goal, and I managed it.”

He’ll need to summon up goals with the same willpower for the second leg on Frankfurt’s tie with Napoli, with the Italian side leading 2-0 at the halfway stage on the tie. “They’re definitely the strongest team in Serie A,” says Kamada. But if his side does manage to pull off an impressive comeback in the second leg, where better to celebrate with a good cup of coffee than in Italy?

Passion and glory
Interview

Passion and glory

Daichi Kamada is thriving off the fervour of Frankfurt’s supporters as he revels in the opportunity to play Champions League football

WORDS Chris Burke

Given that he lists “drinking coffee” as one of his few hobbies, it’s probably for the best that Daichi Kamada is very good at football. The Frankfurt midfielder enjoys the simpler things in life, but don’t get the mistaken impression that he lacks a taste for excitement. Kamada’s talents recently took him to the World Cup with Japan, yet he could not be happier than in the cauldron of the European game – and feeding off the raw energy of Frankfurt’s supporters. 

“The World Cup has more of a festival atmosphere,” says the 26-year-old, Japan having reached the last 16 in Qatar. “You’re able to have a conversation in the stadium during matches. Coming back to Frankfurt, I’m reminded of why I love playing in such a passionate setting. The top tiers of England and Germany are probably the only places you can experience playing in front of such crowds, so I feel really blessed to play here.”

Kamada joined the Eagles straight from J1 League side Sagan Tosu in 2017, and he is still in awe of the difference in fan cultures. “In Europe, the crowd will react noticeably to every individual play. Especially here in Germany, where the stadium will beat full capacity for every match. Our supporters in Frankfurt are especially passionate, and we’ll have crowds in the tens of thousands even for friendlies against fifth-tier clubs. You don’t see support on that level in Japan.

Daichi Kamada has been relishing his Champions League adventure (top); Winning last season’s Europa League gave Kamada a taste for the big stage

Knockabouts with amateur teams might get the juices flowing, but that scarcely compares to the atmosphere at European games – and Kamada has become accustomed to such high-stakes encounters in recent times. First came Frankfurt’s run to the Europa League title last season, the No15 chipping in with five goals before converting his penalty in the shoot-out defeat of Rangers in the final.

Victory in Seville secured Frankfurt a place in this season’s Champions League, and fulfilled a longheld ambition for Kamada. “It’s the reason I came to Europe and my dream is the same,” he says. “I always wanted to play for a team that has a chance of winning the Champions League.” 

Frankfurt have impressed in their first tilt at the European Cup since they lost the epic 1960 final 7-3 to Real Madrid. The Eagles finished runners-up to Tottenham Hotspur in Group D, with Kamada contributing three goals along the way – including a poignant opener in their 3-2 loss at Spurs. “It was the day I heard that my best friend’s mother had passed away,” he says. “He asked me to score a goal, and I managed it.”

He’ll need to summon up goals with the same willpower for the second leg on Frankfurt’s tie with Napoli, with the Italian side leading 2-0 at the halfway stage on the tie. “They’re definitely the strongest team in Serie A,” says Kamada. But if his side does manage to pull off an impressive comeback in the second leg, where better to celebrate with a good cup of coffee than in Italy?

Penalty Pedigree

Etiam erat velit scelerisque in dictum non. Dictum non consectetur a erat nam at. Scelerisque felis imperdiet proin fermentum leo. Nibh tortor id aliquet lectus proin nibh nisl. Nulla at volutpat diam ut venenatis. At urna condimentum mattis pellentesque id nibh tortor id aliquet. Leo a diam sollicitudin tempor id eu nisl nunc mi. Dui vivamus arcu felis bibendum ut. Pharetra convallis posuere morbi leo urna molestie. Adipiscing at in tellus integer feugiat scelerisque. In arcu cursus euismod quis. Dictum non consectetur a erat nam at lectus urna duis. Facilisi nullam vehicula ipsum a arcu cursus. At tempor commodo ullamcorper a lacus vestibulum sed arcu non. Ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur adipiscing elit pellentesque habitant. Vitae sapien pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus. Eget nullam non nisi est sit amet facilisis. Ipsum consequat nisl vel pretium lectus quam. Elit sed vulputate mi sit amet mauris commodo quis. Pretium fusce id velit ut tortor pretium viverra suspendisse potenti.

Given that he lists “drinking coffee” as one of his few hobbies, it’s probably for the best that Daichi Kamada is very good at football. The Frankfurt midfielder enjoys the simpler things in life, but don’t get the mistaken impression that he lacks a taste for excitement. Kamada’s talents recently took him to the World Cup with Japan, yet he could not be happier than in the cauldron of the European game – and feeding off the raw energy of Frankfurt’s supporters. 

“The World Cup has more of a festival atmosphere,” says the 26-year-old, Japan having reached the last 16 in Qatar. “You’re able to have a conversation in the stadium during matches. Coming back to Frankfurt, I’m reminded of why I love playing in such a passionate setting. The top tiers of England and Germany are probably the only places you can experience playing in front of such crowds, so I feel really blessed to play here.”

Kamada joined the Eagles straight from J1 League side Sagan Tosu in 2017, and he is still in awe of the difference in fan cultures. “In Europe, the crowd will react noticeably to every individual play. Especially here in Germany, where the stadium will beat full capacity for every match. Our supporters in Frankfurt are especially passionate, and we’ll have crowds in the tens of thousands even for friendlies against fifth-tier clubs. You don’t see support on that level in Japan.

Daichi Kamada has been relishing his Champions League adventure (top); Winning last season’s Europa League gave Kamada a taste for the big stage

Knockabouts with amateur teams might get the juices flowing, but that scarcely compares to the atmosphere at European games – and Kamada has become accustomed to such high-stakes encounters in recent times. First came Frankfurt’s run to the Europa League title last season, the No15 chipping in with five goals before converting his penalty in the shoot-out defeat of Rangers in the final.

Victory in Seville secured Frankfurt a place in this season’s Champions League, and fulfilled a longheld ambition for Kamada. “It’s the reason I came to Europe and my dream is the same,” he says. “I always wanted to play for a team that has a chance of winning the Champions League.” 

Frankfurt have impressed in their first tilt at the European Cup since they lost the epic 1960 final 7-3 to Real Madrid. The Eagles finished runners-up to Tottenham Hotspur in Group D, with Kamada contributing three goals along the way – including a poignant opener in their 3-2 loss at Spurs. “It was the day I heard that my best friend’s mother had passed away,” he says. “He asked me to score a goal, and I managed it.”

He’ll need to summon up goals with the same willpower for the second leg on Frankfurt’s tie with Napoli, with the Italian side leading 2-0 at the halfway stage on the tie. “They’re definitely the strongest team in Serie A,” says Kamada. But if his side does manage to pull off an impressive comeback in the second leg, where better to celebrate with a good cup of coffee than in Italy?

Read the full story
Sign up now to get access to this and every premium feature on Champions Journal. You will also get access to member-only competitions and offers. And you get all of that completely free!

Given that he lists “drinking coffee” as one of his few hobbies, it’s probably for the best that Daichi Kamada is very good at football. The Frankfurt midfielder enjoys the simpler things in life, but don’t get the mistaken impression that he lacks a taste for excitement. Kamada’s talents recently took him to the World Cup with Japan, yet he could not be happier than in the cauldron of the European game – and feeding off the raw energy of Frankfurt’s supporters. 

“The World Cup has more of a festival atmosphere,” says the 26-year-old, Japan having reached the last 16 in Qatar. “You’re able to have a conversation in the stadium during matches. Coming back to Frankfurt, I’m reminded of why I love playing in such a passionate setting. The top tiers of England and Germany are probably the only places you can experience playing in front of such crowds, so I feel really blessed to play here.”

Kamada joined the Eagles straight from J1 League side Sagan Tosu in 2017, and he is still in awe of the difference in fan cultures. “In Europe, the crowd will react noticeably to every individual play. Especially here in Germany, where the stadium will beat full capacity for every match. Our supporters in Frankfurt are especially passionate, and we’ll have crowds in the tens of thousands even for friendlies against fifth-tier clubs. You don’t see support on that level in Japan.

Daichi Kamada has been relishing his Champions League adventure (top); Winning last season’s Europa League gave Kamada a taste for the big stage

Knockabouts with amateur teams might get the juices flowing, but that scarcely compares to the atmosphere at European games – and Kamada has become accustomed to such high-stakes encounters in recent times. First came Frankfurt’s run to the Europa League title last season, the No15 chipping in with five goals before converting his penalty in the shoot-out defeat of Rangers in the final.

Victory in Seville secured Frankfurt a place in this season’s Champions League, and fulfilled a longheld ambition for Kamada. “It’s the reason I came to Europe and my dream is the same,” he says. “I always wanted to play for a team that has a chance of winning the Champions League.” 

Frankfurt have impressed in their first tilt at the European Cup since they lost the epic 1960 final 7-3 to Real Madrid. The Eagles finished runners-up to Tottenham Hotspur in Group D, with Kamada contributing three goals along the way – including a poignant opener in their 3-2 loss at Spurs. “It was the day I heard that my best friend’s mother had passed away,” he says. “He asked me to score a goal, and I managed it.”

He’ll need to summon up goals with the same willpower for the second leg on Frankfurt’s tie with Napoli, with the Italian side leading 2-0 at the halfway stage on the tie. “They’re definitely the strongest team in Serie A,” says Kamada. But if his side does manage to pull off an impressive comeback in the second leg, where better to celebrate with a good cup of coffee than in Italy?

Penalty Pedigree

Etiam erat velit scelerisque in dictum non. Dictum non consectetur a erat nam at. Scelerisque felis imperdiet proin fermentum leo. Nibh tortor id aliquet lectus proin nibh nisl. Nulla at volutpat diam ut venenatis. At urna condimentum mattis pellentesque id nibh tortor id aliquet. Leo a diam sollicitudin tempor id eu nisl nunc mi. Dui vivamus arcu felis bibendum ut. Pharetra convallis posuere morbi leo urna molestie. Adipiscing at in tellus integer feugiat scelerisque. In arcu cursus euismod quis. Dictum non consectetur a erat nam at lectus urna duis. Facilisi nullam vehicula ipsum a arcu cursus. At tempor commodo ullamcorper a lacus vestibulum sed arcu non. Ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur adipiscing elit pellentesque habitant. Vitae sapien pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus. Eget nullam non nisi est sit amet facilisis. Ipsum consequat nisl vel pretium lectus quam. Elit sed vulputate mi sit amet mauris commodo quis. Pretium fusce id velit ut tortor pretium viverra suspendisse potenti.

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