Interview

Making a big impression

Everyone’s favourite underdog story so far, Club Brugge have defied the odds in the group stage. Former Barcelona forward Ferran Jutglà has been key to proceedings; we caught up with him to talk growing up and branching out

What was it like growing up in Catalonia’s Sant Julià?

In small towns you have fewer things to do, so we had our football pitch that we always used to play on. The one place we usually went to was Vic, which is 15 minutes away, and there were five or six pitches – we used to play there in the neighbourhood with other friends. We used to enjoy that because you could go out of your town and see new things; that’s when you can learn new things. When we were 15 or 16 years old, every time we had the chance, we would take the train to Barcelona to spend the day there, to get out of our daily routine.

You’re a hero in Sant Julià right?

Yes, my town is pretty happy seeing how I matured and fought to be where I am today. A boy from Sant Julià de Vilatorta, a town with a population of less than 4,000, is playing in the Champions League. It is not easy, so I have to feel proud. I feel that my family, my friends and the friends of my friends, who are also my friends in the town – everyone is really proud of me. I know they are following me and they’re Brugge fans right now.

Speaking of Club Brugge, what were your thoughts when you found out they wanted to sign you?

I remember we had a meeting – a video-call with the people from the club. They called me and I was with my agents, and they explained the project to me and showed me the facilities, which are wonderful. They told me I could develop here. I was told that I would get to play every weekend and that this was a good place for me to develop. I listened to that with my agents and we could see that the club was interested. For me, it’s very important to feel valued. They were giving me responsibilities. We looked into the history of the club and the club gave me a lot of information. But we really liked the project throughout the negotiations, so we came here without thinking twice.

What was it like to adapt?

I think that, at the end of the day, you need to have people you can trust around you – I have a performance specialist, Julio Figueroa, and he’s helped me to settle in well. There was a new language, a new city, new team-mates – everything was new. If we hadn’t had an idea and a plan, things would have gone wrong. So before coming here we planned for everything, from looking for a house to how to relate to my team-mates.

Do you get nervous playing in the Champions League?

I don’t know what to tell you. When I step out to play a Champions League match, it’s as if I was playing a league match or a game in Primera Federación [the third tier] in Spain. I don’t have to train or behave differently because it’s the Champions League. I prepare the same way for the league and the Champions League and I step onto the pitch to play football, have a good time and, above all, win.

What was it like growing up in Catalonia’s Sant Julià?

In small towns you have fewer things to do, so we had our football pitch that we always used to play on. The one place we usually went to was Vic, which is 15 minutes away, and there were five or six pitches – we used to play there in the neighbourhood with other friends. We used to enjoy that because you could go out of your town and see new things; that’s when you can learn new things. When we were 15 or 16 years old, every time we had the chance, we would take the train to Barcelona to spend the day there, to get out of our daily routine.

You’re a hero in Sant Julià right?

Yes, my town is pretty happy seeing how I matured and fought to be where I am today. A boy from Sant Julià de Vilatorta, a town with a population of less than 4,000, is playing in the Champions League. It is not easy, so I have to feel proud. I feel that my family, my friends and the friends of my friends, who are also my friends in the town – everyone is really proud of me. I know they are following me and they’re Brugge fans right now.

Speaking of Club Brugge, what were your thoughts when you found out they wanted to sign you?

I remember we had a meeting – a video-call with the people from the club. They called me and I was with my agents, and they explained the project to me and showed me the facilities, which are wonderful. They told me I could develop here. I was told that I would get to play every weekend and that this was a good place for me to develop. I listened to that with my agents and we could see that the club was interested. For me, it’s very important to feel valued. They were giving me responsibilities. We looked into the history of the club and the club gave me a lot of information. But we really liked the project throughout the negotiations, so we came here without thinking twice.

What was it like to adapt?

I think that, at the end of the day, you need to have people you can trust around you – I have a performance specialist, Julio Figueroa, and he’s helped me to settle in well. There was a new language, a new city, new team-mates – everything was new. If we hadn’t had an idea and a plan, things would have gone wrong. So before coming here we planned for everything, from looking for a house to how to relate to my team-mates.

Do you get nervous playing in the Champions League?

I don’t know what to tell you. When I step out to play a Champions League match, it’s as if I was playing a league match or a game in Primera Federación [the third tier] in Spain. I don’t have to train or behave differently because it’s the Champions League. I prepare the same way for the league and the Champions League and I step onto the pitch to play football, have a good time and, above all, win.

Read the full story
Sign up now to get access to this and every premium feature on Champions Journal. You will also get access to member-only competitions and offers. And you get all of that completely free!

What was it like growing up in Catalonia’s Sant Julià?

In small towns you have fewer things to do, so we had our football pitch that we always used to play on. The one place we usually went to was Vic, which is 15 minutes away, and there were five or six pitches – we used to play there in the neighbourhood with other friends. We used to enjoy that because you could go out of your town and see new things; that’s when you can learn new things. When we were 15 or 16 years old, every time we had the chance, we would take the train to Barcelona to spend the day there, to get out of our daily routine.

You’re a hero in Sant Julià right?

Yes, my town is pretty happy seeing how I matured and fought to be where I am today. A boy from Sant Julià de Vilatorta, a town with a population of less than 4,000, is playing in the Champions League. It is not easy, so I have to feel proud. I feel that my family, my friends and the friends of my friends, who are also my friends in the town – everyone is really proud of me. I know they are following me and they’re Brugge fans right now.

Speaking of Club Brugge, what were your thoughts when you found out they wanted to sign you?

I remember we had a meeting – a video-call with the people from the club. They called me and I was with my agents, and they explained the project to me and showed me the facilities, which are wonderful. They told me I could develop here. I was told that I would get to play every weekend and that this was a good place for me to develop. I listened to that with my agents and we could see that the club was interested. For me, it’s very important to feel valued. They were giving me responsibilities. We looked into the history of the club and the club gave me a lot of information. But we really liked the project throughout the negotiations, so we came here without thinking twice.

What was it like to adapt?

I think that, at the end of the day, you need to have people you can trust around you – I have a performance specialist, Julio Figueroa, and he’s helped me to settle in well. There was a new language, a new city, new team-mates – everything was new. If we hadn’t had an idea and a plan, things would have gone wrong. So before coming here we planned for everything, from looking for a house to how to relate to my team-mates.

Do you get nervous playing in the Champions League?

I don’t know what to tell you. When I step out to play a Champions League match, it’s as if I was playing a league match or a game in Primera Federación [the third tier] in Spain. I don’t have to train or behave differently because it’s the Champions League. I prepare the same way for the league and the Champions League and I step onto the pitch to play football, have a good time and, above all, win.

Making a big impression
Interview

Making a big impression

Everyone’s favourite underdog story so far, Club Brugge have defied the odds in the group stage. Former Barcelona forward Ferran Jutglà has been key to proceedings; we caught up with him to talk growing up and branching out

What was it like growing up in Catalonia’s Sant Julià?

In small towns you have fewer things to do, so we had our football pitch that we always used to play on. The one place we usually went to was Vic, which is 15 minutes away, and there were five or six pitches – we used to play there in the neighbourhood with other friends. We used to enjoy that because you could go out of your town and see new things; that’s when you can learn new things. When we were 15 or 16 years old, every time we had the chance, we would take the train to Barcelona to spend the day there, to get out of our daily routine.

You’re a hero in Sant Julià right?

Yes, my town is pretty happy seeing how I matured and fought to be where I am today. A boy from Sant Julià de Vilatorta, a town with a population of less than 4,000, is playing in the Champions League. It is not easy, so I have to feel proud. I feel that my family, my friends and the friends of my friends, who are also my friends in the town – everyone is really proud of me. I know they are following me and they’re Brugge fans right now.

Speaking of Club Brugge, what were your thoughts when you found out they wanted to sign you?

I remember we had a meeting – a video-call with the people from the club. They called me and I was with my agents, and they explained the project to me and showed me the facilities, which are wonderful. They told me I could develop here. I was told that I would get to play every weekend and that this was a good place for me to develop. I listened to that with my agents and we could see that the club was interested. For me, it’s very important to feel valued. They were giving me responsibilities. We looked into the history of the club and the club gave me a lot of information. But we really liked the project throughout the negotiations, so we came here without thinking twice.

What was it like to adapt?

I think that, at the end of the day, you need to have people you can trust around you – I have a performance specialist, Julio Figueroa, and he’s helped me to settle in well. There was a new language, a new city, new team-mates – everything was new. If we hadn’t had an idea and a plan, things would have gone wrong. So before coming here we planned for everything, from looking for a house to how to relate to my team-mates.

Do you get nervous playing in the Champions League?

I don’t know what to tell you. When I step out to play a Champions League match, it’s as if I was playing a league match or a game in Primera Federación [the third tier] in Spain. I don’t have to train or behave differently because it’s the Champions League. I prepare the same way for the league and the Champions League and I step onto the pitch to play football, have a good time and, above all, win.

Penalty Pedigree

Etiam erat velit scelerisque in dictum non. Dictum non consectetur a erat nam at. Scelerisque felis imperdiet proin fermentum leo. Nibh tortor id aliquet lectus proin nibh nisl. Nulla at volutpat diam ut venenatis. At urna condimentum mattis pellentesque id nibh tortor id aliquet. Leo a diam sollicitudin tempor id eu nisl nunc mi. Dui vivamus arcu felis bibendum ut. Pharetra convallis posuere morbi leo urna molestie. Adipiscing at in tellus integer feugiat scelerisque. In arcu cursus euismod quis. Dictum non consectetur a erat nam at lectus urna duis. Facilisi nullam vehicula ipsum a arcu cursus. At tempor commodo ullamcorper a lacus vestibulum sed arcu non. Ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur adipiscing elit pellentesque habitant. Vitae sapien pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus. Eget nullam non nisi est sit amet facilisis. Ipsum consequat nisl vel pretium lectus quam. Elit sed vulputate mi sit amet mauris commodo quis. Pretium fusce id velit ut tortor pretium viverra suspendisse potenti.

What was it like growing up in Catalonia’s Sant Julià?

In small towns you have fewer things to do, so we had our football pitch that we always used to play on. The one place we usually went to was Vic, which is 15 minutes away, and there were five or six pitches – we used to play there in the neighbourhood with other friends. We used to enjoy that because you could go out of your town and see new things; that’s when you can learn new things. When we were 15 or 16 years old, every time we had the chance, we would take the train to Barcelona to spend the day there, to get out of our daily routine.

You’re a hero in Sant Julià right?

Yes, my town is pretty happy seeing how I matured and fought to be where I am today. A boy from Sant Julià de Vilatorta, a town with a population of less than 4,000, is playing in the Champions League. It is not easy, so I have to feel proud. I feel that my family, my friends and the friends of my friends, who are also my friends in the town – everyone is really proud of me. I know they are following me and they’re Brugge fans right now.

Speaking of Club Brugge, what were your thoughts when you found out they wanted to sign you?

I remember we had a meeting – a video-call with the people from the club. They called me and I was with my agents, and they explained the project to me and showed me the facilities, which are wonderful. They told me I could develop here. I was told that I would get to play every weekend and that this was a good place for me to develop. I listened to that with my agents and we could see that the club was interested. For me, it’s very important to feel valued. They were giving me responsibilities. We looked into the history of the club and the club gave me a lot of information. But we really liked the project throughout the negotiations, so we came here without thinking twice.

What was it like to adapt?

I think that, at the end of the day, you need to have people you can trust around you – I have a performance specialist, Julio Figueroa, and he’s helped me to settle in well. There was a new language, a new city, new team-mates – everything was new. If we hadn’t had an idea and a plan, things would have gone wrong. So before coming here we planned for everything, from looking for a house to how to relate to my team-mates.

Do you get nervous playing in the Champions League?

I don’t know what to tell you. When I step out to play a Champions League match, it’s as if I was playing a league match or a game in Primera Federación [the third tier] in Spain. I don’t have to train or behave differently because it’s the Champions League. I prepare the same way for the league and the Champions League and I step onto the pitch to play football, have a good time and, above all, win.

Read the full story
Sign up now to get access to this and every premium feature on Champions Journal. You will also get access to member-only competitions and offers. And you get all of that completely free!

What was it like growing up in Catalonia’s Sant Julià?

In small towns you have fewer things to do, so we had our football pitch that we always used to play on. The one place we usually went to was Vic, which is 15 minutes away, and there were five or six pitches – we used to play there in the neighbourhood with other friends. We used to enjoy that because you could go out of your town and see new things; that’s when you can learn new things. When we were 15 or 16 years old, every time we had the chance, we would take the train to Barcelona to spend the day there, to get out of our daily routine.

You’re a hero in Sant Julià right?

Yes, my town is pretty happy seeing how I matured and fought to be where I am today. A boy from Sant Julià de Vilatorta, a town with a population of less than 4,000, is playing in the Champions League. It is not easy, so I have to feel proud. I feel that my family, my friends and the friends of my friends, who are also my friends in the town – everyone is really proud of me. I know they are following me and they’re Brugge fans right now.

Speaking of Club Brugge, what were your thoughts when you found out they wanted to sign you?

I remember we had a meeting – a video-call with the people from the club. They called me and I was with my agents, and they explained the project to me and showed me the facilities, which are wonderful. They told me I could develop here. I was told that I would get to play every weekend and that this was a good place for me to develop. I listened to that with my agents and we could see that the club was interested. For me, it’s very important to feel valued. They were giving me responsibilities. We looked into the history of the club and the club gave me a lot of information. But we really liked the project throughout the negotiations, so we came here without thinking twice.

What was it like to adapt?

I think that, at the end of the day, you need to have people you can trust around you – I have a performance specialist, Julio Figueroa, and he’s helped me to settle in well. There was a new language, a new city, new team-mates – everything was new. If we hadn’t had an idea and a plan, things would have gone wrong. So before coming here we planned for everything, from looking for a house to how to relate to my team-mates.

Do you get nervous playing in the Champions League?

I don’t know what to tell you. When I step out to play a Champions League match, it’s as if I was playing a league match or a game in Primera Federación [the third tier] in Spain. I don’t have to train or behave differently because it’s the Champions League. I prepare the same way for the league and the Champions League and I step onto the pitch to play football, have a good time and, above all, win.

Penalty Pedigree

Etiam erat velit scelerisque in dictum non. Dictum non consectetur a erat nam at. Scelerisque felis imperdiet proin fermentum leo. Nibh tortor id aliquet lectus proin nibh nisl. Nulla at volutpat diam ut venenatis. At urna condimentum mattis pellentesque id nibh tortor id aliquet. Leo a diam sollicitudin tempor id eu nisl nunc mi. Dui vivamus arcu felis bibendum ut. Pharetra convallis posuere morbi leo urna molestie. Adipiscing at in tellus integer feugiat scelerisque. In arcu cursus euismod quis. Dictum non consectetur a erat nam at lectus urna duis. Facilisi nullam vehicula ipsum a arcu cursus. At tempor commodo ullamcorper a lacus vestibulum sed arcu non. Ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur adipiscing elit pellentesque habitant. Vitae sapien pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus. Eget nullam non nisi est sit amet facilisis. Ipsum consequat nisl vel pretium lectus quam. Elit sed vulputate mi sit amet mauris commodo quis. Pretium fusce id velit ut tortor pretium viverra suspendisse potenti.

To access this article, as well as all CJ+ content and competitions, you will need a subscription to Champions Journal.
Already a subscriber? Sign in
close
Special Offers
christmas offer
Christmas CHEER
Up to 40% off
Start shopping
50% off
game night flash sale!!!
Don't miss out
00
Hours
:
00
minutes
:
00
Seconds
Valid on selected products only. subscriptions not included
close