Fashion

Cutting a dash

Salzburg coach Matthias Jaissle has made history with the Austrian club this season – and won points for presentation along the way

WORDS Daniel-Yaw Miller

For managers, touchline style comes in many shapes and sizes. It’s nothing short of an art to look good – and stay looking good for 90 minutes – while screaming at your players above the din of the crowd, questioning referees on every close call and getting carried away in goal celebrations (witness José Mourinho v Manchester United, 2004).

Some managers just get it. Arsène Wenger – the godfather of touchline elegance – stayed loyal to the professorial suit and tie, also incorporating the now famous head-to-toe ‘Wenger coat’ in the colder winter months (when he could do up the zip). Meanwhile, Pep Guardiola has taken dugout fashion to new places with his love of streetwear and fresh white sneakers.

One gaffer who cuts a dash is among the Champions League’s youngest ever bosses: RB Salzburg’s Matthias Jaissle. A former Hoffenheim defender, he was a regular starter under Ralf Rangnick as the club rose through the divisions to the Bundesliga, before his playing career was cut short by persistent injuries. A cruciate ligament rupture in 2009, followed soon after by a torn Achilles, led to him hanging up his boots aged just 26. Since then the 33-year-old has enjoyed a rapid ascent as a coach, progressing from an assistant’s role with Norwegian club Brøndby to the top job at the Austrian Bundesliga’s reigning champions in two years. 

Comparisons have inevitably been drawn between Jaissle and his German compatriot Julian Nagelsmann, who made his name in charge of Salzburg’s sister club, RB Leipzig. There are echoes too of Jaissle’s predecessor Jesse Marsch, now at Leeds United, who delivered league and cup doubles in both his seasons at Salzburg before being recruited by Leipzig to fill the role vacated thanks to Nagelsmann’s switch to Bayern München. 

For managers, touchline style comes in many shapes and sizes. It’s nothing short of an art to look good – and stay looking good for 90 minutes – while screaming at your players above the din of the crowd, questioning referees on every close call and getting carried away in goal celebrations (witness José Mourinho v Manchester United, 2004).

Some managers just get it. Arsène Wenger – the godfather of touchline elegance – stayed loyal to the professorial suit and tie, also incorporating the now famous head-to-toe ‘Wenger coat’ in the colder winter months (when he could do up the zip). Meanwhile, Pep Guardiola has taken dugout fashion to new places with his love of streetwear and fresh white sneakers.

One gaffer who cuts a dash is among the Champions League’s youngest ever bosses: RB Salzburg’s Matthias Jaissle. A former Hoffenheim defender, he was a regular starter under Ralf Rangnick as the club rose through the divisions to the Bundesliga, before his playing career was cut short by persistent injuries. A cruciate ligament rupture in 2009, followed soon after by a torn Achilles, led to him hanging up his boots aged just 26. Since then the 33-year-old has enjoyed a rapid ascent as a coach, progressing from an assistant’s role with Norwegian club Brøndby to the top job at the Austrian Bundesliga’s reigning champions in two years. 

Comparisons have inevitably been drawn between Jaissle and his German compatriot Julian Nagelsmann, who made his name in charge of Salzburg’s sister club, RB Leipzig. There are echoes too of Jaissle’s predecessor Jesse Marsch, now at Leeds United, who delivered league and cup doubles in both his seasons at Salzburg before being recruited by Leipzig to fill the role vacated thanks to Nagelsmann’s switch to Bayern München. 

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All three coaches also rank highly in the league table for managerial flair. Jaissle’s style – straight from the Guardiola school of touchline swagger – is varied, versatile and never anything more than smart casual at its most formal. Comfortable in a range of attire, the Salzburg boss often favours laidback looks, featuring open-neck shirts and cropped trousers paired with spotless white trainers. He’s also not afraid to switch it up, donning grey rollneck sweaters with blazers or a trench coat when a more serious approach is needed.

What a coach chooses to wear on the touchline can reveal a lot about their character, as well as their relationship with the players. Jaissle’s wardrobe reflects the fact that he is closer in age to his playing staff than most of his counterparts, suggesting he leans more on tactical mastery to earn respect. Older managers, who often favour a hard-line approach, are likelier to plump for a suit – signalling greater distance from their players – or the old-school tough-guy tracksuit, like Sir Alex Ferguson in his early career. 

Jaissle’s style – straight from the Guardiola school of touchline swagger – is varied, versatile and never anything more than smart casual

Jaissle’s penchant for casualwear helps to cultivate a more relaxed atmosphere, indicative of his budding reputation as a tactician rather than a disciplinarian. Even when pitchside in a tracksuit, he prefers a look in keeping with his own players’ pre-game attire. His wardrobe is an insight into the many powerful non-verbal tools that managers have at their disposal to shape their relationship with their squad.

The German manager’s sartorial prowess is mirrored by his team’s exploits on the pitch, where the likes of explosive forward Karim Adeyemi and 21-year-old American midfielder Brenden Aaronson have shone this term. More than that, they have blazed a trail as the first Austrian side in history to reach the Champions League knockout phase. 

Success at Salzburg has served as a springboard for stars who caught the eye of Europe’s biggest names: Erling Haaland, Sadio Mané and Naby Keïta to name three. But if Salzburg continue to make headlines, it could be Jaissle that the club struggle to keep hold of. The managerial merry-go-round shows no sign of slowing and willing suitors for the Salzburg hot seat won’t be hard to find – yet few in the dugout come as slick as Matthias Jaissle, with a win record to match. 

For managers, touchline style comes in many shapes and sizes. It’s nothing short of an art to look good – and stay looking good for 90 minutes – while screaming at your players above the din of the crowd, questioning referees on every close call and getting carried away in goal celebrations (witness José Mourinho v Manchester United, 2004).

Some managers just get it. Arsène Wenger – the godfather of touchline elegance – stayed loyal to the professorial suit and tie, also incorporating the now famous head-to-toe ‘Wenger coat’ in the colder winter months (when he could do up the zip). Meanwhile, Pep Guardiola has taken dugout fashion to new places with his love of streetwear and fresh white sneakers.

One gaffer who cuts a dash is among the Champions League’s youngest ever bosses: RB Salzburg’s Matthias Jaissle. A former Hoffenheim defender, he was a regular starter under Ralf Rangnick as the club rose through the divisions to the Bundesliga, before his playing career was cut short by persistent injuries. A cruciate ligament rupture in 2009, followed soon after by a torn Achilles, led to him hanging up his boots aged just 26. Since then the 33-year-old has enjoyed a rapid ascent as a coach, progressing from an assistant’s role with Norwegian club Brøndby to the top job at the Austrian Bundesliga’s reigning champions in two years. 

Comparisons have inevitably been drawn between Jaissle and his German compatriot Julian Nagelsmann, who made his name in charge of Salzburg’s sister club, RB Leipzig. There are echoes too of Jaissle’s predecessor Jesse Marsch, now at Leeds United, who delivered league and cup doubles in both his seasons at Salzburg before being recruited by Leipzig to fill the role vacated thanks to Nagelsmann’s switch to Bayern München. 

Cutting a dash
Fashion

Cutting a dash

Salzburg coach Matthias Jaissle has made history with the Austrian club this season – and won points for presentation along the way

WORDS Daniel-Yaw Miller

For managers, touchline style comes in many shapes and sizes. It’s nothing short of an art to look good – and stay looking good for 90 minutes – while screaming at your players above the din of the crowd, questioning referees on every close call and getting carried away in goal celebrations (witness José Mourinho v Manchester United, 2004).

Some managers just get it. Arsène Wenger – the godfather of touchline elegance – stayed loyal to the professorial suit and tie, also incorporating the now famous head-to-toe ‘Wenger coat’ in the colder winter months (when he could do up the zip). Meanwhile, Pep Guardiola has taken dugout fashion to new places with his love of streetwear and fresh white sneakers.

One gaffer who cuts a dash is among the Champions League’s youngest ever bosses: RB Salzburg’s Matthias Jaissle. A former Hoffenheim defender, he was a regular starter under Ralf Rangnick as the club rose through the divisions to the Bundesliga, before his playing career was cut short by persistent injuries. A cruciate ligament rupture in 2009, followed soon after by a torn Achilles, led to him hanging up his boots aged just 26. Since then the 33-year-old has enjoyed a rapid ascent as a coach, progressing from an assistant’s role with Norwegian club Brøndby to the top job at the Austrian Bundesliga’s reigning champions in two years. 

Comparisons have inevitably been drawn between Jaissle and his German compatriot Julian Nagelsmann, who made his name in charge of Salzburg’s sister club, RB Leipzig. There are echoes too of Jaissle’s predecessor Jesse Marsch, now at Leeds United, who delivered league and cup doubles in both his seasons at Salzburg before being recruited by Leipzig to fill the role vacated thanks to Nagelsmann’s switch to Bayern München. 

Penalty Pedigree

Etiam erat velit scelerisque in dictum non. Dictum non consectetur a erat nam at. Scelerisque felis imperdiet proin fermentum leo. Nibh tortor id aliquet lectus proin nibh nisl. Nulla at volutpat diam ut venenatis. At urna condimentum mattis pellentesque id nibh tortor id aliquet. Leo a diam sollicitudin tempor id eu nisl nunc mi. Dui vivamus arcu felis bibendum ut. Pharetra convallis posuere morbi leo urna molestie. Adipiscing at in tellus integer feugiat scelerisque. In arcu cursus euismod quis. Dictum non consectetur a erat nam at lectus urna duis. Facilisi nullam vehicula ipsum a arcu cursus. At tempor commodo ullamcorper a lacus vestibulum sed arcu non. Ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur adipiscing elit pellentesque habitant. Vitae sapien pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus. Eget nullam non nisi est sit amet facilisis. Ipsum consequat nisl vel pretium lectus quam. Elit sed vulputate mi sit amet mauris commodo quis. Pretium fusce id velit ut tortor pretium viverra suspendisse potenti.

For managers, touchline style comes in many shapes and sizes. It’s nothing short of an art to look good – and stay looking good for 90 minutes – while screaming at your players above the din of the crowd, questioning referees on every close call and getting carried away in goal celebrations (witness José Mourinho v Manchester United, 2004).

Some managers just get it. Arsène Wenger – the godfather of touchline elegance – stayed loyal to the professorial suit and tie, also incorporating the now famous head-to-toe ‘Wenger coat’ in the colder winter months (when he could do up the zip). Meanwhile, Pep Guardiola has taken dugout fashion to new places with his love of streetwear and fresh white sneakers.

One gaffer who cuts a dash is among the Champions League’s youngest ever bosses: RB Salzburg’s Matthias Jaissle. A former Hoffenheim defender, he was a regular starter under Ralf Rangnick as the club rose through the divisions to the Bundesliga, before his playing career was cut short by persistent injuries. A cruciate ligament rupture in 2009, followed soon after by a torn Achilles, led to him hanging up his boots aged just 26. Since then the 33-year-old has enjoyed a rapid ascent as a coach, progressing from an assistant’s role with Norwegian club Brøndby to the top job at the Austrian Bundesliga’s reigning champions in two years. 

Comparisons have inevitably been drawn between Jaissle and his German compatriot Julian Nagelsmann, who made his name in charge of Salzburg’s sister club, RB Leipzig. There are echoes too of Jaissle’s predecessor Jesse Marsch, now at Leeds United, who delivered league and cup doubles in both his seasons at Salzburg before being recruited by Leipzig to fill the role vacated thanks to Nagelsmann’s switch to Bayern München. 

Read the full story
Sign up now to get access to this and every premium feature on Champions Journal. You will also get access to member-only competitions and offers. And you get all of that completely free!

All three coaches also rank highly in the league table for managerial flair. Jaissle’s style – straight from the Guardiola school of touchline swagger – is varied, versatile and never anything more than smart casual at its most formal. Comfortable in a range of attire, the Salzburg boss often favours laidback looks, featuring open-neck shirts and cropped trousers paired with spotless white trainers. He’s also not afraid to switch it up, donning grey rollneck sweaters with blazers or a trench coat when a more serious approach is needed.

What a coach chooses to wear on the touchline can reveal a lot about their character, as well as their relationship with the players. Jaissle’s wardrobe reflects the fact that he is closer in age to his playing staff than most of his counterparts, suggesting he leans more on tactical mastery to earn respect. Older managers, who often favour a hard-line approach, are likelier to plump for a suit – signalling greater distance from their players – or the old-school tough-guy tracksuit, like Sir Alex Ferguson in his early career. 

Jaissle’s style – straight from the Guardiola school of touchline swagger – is varied, versatile and never anything more than smart casual

Jaissle’s penchant for casualwear helps to cultivate a more relaxed atmosphere, indicative of his budding reputation as a tactician rather than a disciplinarian. Even when pitchside in a tracksuit, he prefers a look in keeping with his own players’ pre-game attire. His wardrobe is an insight into the many powerful non-verbal tools that managers have at their disposal to shape their relationship with their squad.

The German manager’s sartorial prowess is mirrored by his team’s exploits on the pitch, where the likes of explosive forward Karim Adeyemi and 21-year-old American midfielder Brenden Aaronson have shone this term. More than that, they have blazed a trail as the first Austrian side in history to reach the Champions League knockout phase. 

Success at Salzburg has served as a springboard for stars who caught the eye of Europe’s biggest names: Erling Haaland, Sadio Mané and Naby Keïta to name three. But if Salzburg continue to make headlines, it could be Jaissle that the club struggle to keep hold of. The managerial merry-go-round shows no sign of slowing and willing suitors for the Salzburg hot seat won’t be hard to find – yet few in the dugout come as slick as Matthias Jaissle, with a win record to match. 

For managers, touchline style comes in many shapes and sizes. It’s nothing short of an art to look good – and stay looking good for 90 minutes – while screaming at your players above the din of the crowd, questioning referees on every close call and getting carried away in goal celebrations (witness José Mourinho v Manchester United, 2004).

Some managers just get it. Arsène Wenger – the godfather of touchline elegance – stayed loyal to the professorial suit and tie, also incorporating the now famous head-to-toe ‘Wenger coat’ in the colder winter months (when he could do up the zip). Meanwhile, Pep Guardiola has taken dugout fashion to new places with his love of streetwear and fresh white sneakers.

One gaffer who cuts a dash is among the Champions League’s youngest ever bosses: RB Salzburg’s Matthias Jaissle. A former Hoffenheim defender, he was a regular starter under Ralf Rangnick as the club rose through the divisions to the Bundesliga, before his playing career was cut short by persistent injuries. A cruciate ligament rupture in 2009, followed soon after by a torn Achilles, led to him hanging up his boots aged just 26. Since then the 33-year-old has enjoyed a rapid ascent as a coach, progressing from an assistant’s role with Norwegian club Brøndby to the top job at the Austrian Bundesliga’s reigning champions in two years. 

Comparisons have inevitably been drawn between Jaissle and his German compatriot Julian Nagelsmann, who made his name in charge of Salzburg’s sister club, RB Leipzig. There are echoes too of Jaissle’s predecessor Jesse Marsch, now at Leeds United, who delivered league and cup doubles in both his seasons at Salzburg before being recruited by Leipzig to fill the role vacated thanks to Nagelsmann’s switch to Bayern München. 

Penalty Pedigree

Etiam erat velit scelerisque in dictum non. Dictum non consectetur a erat nam at. Scelerisque felis imperdiet proin fermentum leo. Nibh tortor id aliquet lectus proin nibh nisl. Nulla at volutpat diam ut venenatis. At urna condimentum mattis pellentesque id nibh tortor id aliquet. Leo a diam sollicitudin tempor id eu nisl nunc mi. Dui vivamus arcu felis bibendum ut. Pharetra convallis posuere morbi leo urna molestie. Adipiscing at in tellus integer feugiat scelerisque. In arcu cursus euismod quis. Dictum non consectetur a erat nam at lectus urna duis. Facilisi nullam vehicula ipsum a arcu cursus. At tempor commodo ullamcorper a lacus vestibulum sed arcu non. Ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur adipiscing elit pellentesque habitant. Vitae sapien pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus. Eget nullam non nisi est sit amet facilisis. Ipsum consequat nisl vel pretium lectus quam. Elit sed vulputate mi sit amet mauris commodo quis. Pretium fusce id velit ut tortor pretium viverra suspendisse potenti.

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