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Insight

Classic cut

We focus on the 2003 semi-final between two teams who call a fashion capital home

WORDS John Atkin | PHOTOGRAPHY Chris Ower-Davis

A commitment to couture is woven through the fabric of Milan, right down to its name: famed for the production of luxury goods, as long ago as the 1500s it inspired the old English word ‘milaner’, meaning ‘fine wares’. Five hundred years on and the capital of Lombardy remains true to its moniker. It’s home to the great and the good of the world’s fashion houses and, since 1958, an eponymous semi-annual fashion week.

In spring 2003, Naomi Campbell and Linda Evangelista were showcasing collections united by bold colours but unusually polarised in their offering. Across town at the San Siro, life was imitating art. There was nothing subtle about the kits as the star-studded teams of AC Milan and Inter knelt down to face the explosion of pre-match flashbulbs ahead of an historic clash in their Champions League semi-final. Both wore traditional colours: Milan in the red and black they have sported since 1899 and Inter in black and blue, the latter chosen because it was deemed opposite to red. The brightness of the primary colours was turned up to 11 in both cases.

A commitment to couture is woven through the fabric of Milan, right down to its name: famed for the production of luxury goods, as long ago as the 1500s it inspired the old English word ‘milaner’, meaning ‘fine wares’. Five hundred years on and the capital of Lombardy remains true to its moniker. It’s home to the great and the good of the world’s fashion houses and, since 1958, an eponymous semi-annual fashion week.

In spring 2003, Naomi Campbell and Linda Evangelista were showcasing collections united by bold colours but unusually polarised in their offering. Across town at the San Siro, life was imitating art. There was nothing subtle about the kits as the star-studded teams of AC Milan and Inter knelt down to face the explosion of pre-match flashbulbs ahead of an historic clash in their Champions League semi-final. Both wore traditional colours: Milan in the red and black they have sported since 1899 and Inter in black and blue, the latter chosen because it was deemed opposite to red. The brightness of the primary colours was turned up to 11 in both cases.

Read the full story
Sign up now to get access to this and every premium feature on Champions Journal. You will also get access to member-only competitions and offers. And you get all of that completely free!

The cut was very much of its time. Men’s fashion in the early 2000s was all about baggy clothes – everything was oversized. When Andriy Shevchenko sprinted towards the bench after scoring the first goal of the tie, just before half-time in the ‘away’ second leg, his outstretched arms revealed so much material that you half expected him to take flight. Obafemi Martins’ acrobatic celebration (front handspring, five somersaults) following his late equaliser was all the more impressive because of his voluminous shirt; featuring an electric yellow trim, it was wrapped around his face for most of it. The V-neck offered little resistance.

Alas, Martins’ goal wasn’t enough for the Nerazzurri, who were ultimately edged out on away goals. Instead it was the Milan side of Paolo Maldini, Alessandro Nesta and Andrea Pirlo (three men who could have graced any catwalk) that advanced to the Old Trafford final. There they saw off Juventus, resplendent in black and white. Safe to say that Milan earned their stripes that season.We focus on the 2003 semi-final between two teams who call a fashion capital home

A commitment to couture is woven through the fabric of Milan, right down to its name: famed for the production of luxury goods, as long ago as the 1500s it inspired the old English word ‘milaner’, meaning ‘fine wares’. Five hundred years on and the capital of Lombardy remains true to its moniker. It’s home to the great and the good of the world’s fashion houses and, since 1958, an eponymous semi-annual fashion week.

In spring 2003, Naomi Campbell and Linda Evangelista were showcasing collections united by bold colours but unusually polarised in their offering. Across town at the San Siro, life was imitating art. There was nothing subtle about the kits as the star-studded teams of AC Milan and Inter knelt down to face the explosion of pre-match flashbulbs ahead of an historic clash in their Champions League semi-final. Both wore traditional colours: Milan in the red and black they have sported since 1899 and Inter in black and blue, the latter chosen because it was deemed opposite to red. The brightness of the primary colours was turned up to 11 in both cases.

Classic cut
Insight

Classic cut

We focus on the 2003 semi-final between two teams who call a fashion capital home

WORDS John Atkin | PHOTOGRAPHY Chris Ower-Davis

A commitment to couture is woven through the fabric of Milan, right down to its name: famed for the production of luxury goods, as long ago as the 1500s it inspired the old English word ‘milaner’, meaning ‘fine wares’. Five hundred years on and the capital of Lombardy remains true to its moniker. It’s home to the great and the good of the world’s fashion houses and, since 1958, an eponymous semi-annual fashion week.

In spring 2003, Naomi Campbell and Linda Evangelista were showcasing collections united by bold colours but unusually polarised in their offering. Across town at the San Siro, life was imitating art. There was nothing subtle about the kits as the star-studded teams of AC Milan and Inter knelt down to face the explosion of pre-match flashbulbs ahead of an historic clash in their Champions League semi-final. Both wore traditional colours: Milan in the red and black they have sported since 1899 and Inter in black and blue, the latter chosen because it was deemed opposite to red. The brightness of the primary colours was turned up to 11 in both cases.

Penalty Pedigree

Etiam erat velit scelerisque in dictum non. Dictum non consectetur a erat nam at. Scelerisque felis imperdiet proin fermentum leo. Nibh tortor id aliquet lectus proin nibh nisl. Nulla at volutpat diam ut venenatis. At urna condimentum mattis pellentesque id nibh tortor id aliquet. Leo a diam sollicitudin tempor id eu nisl nunc mi. Dui vivamus arcu felis bibendum ut. Pharetra convallis posuere morbi leo urna molestie. Adipiscing at in tellus integer feugiat scelerisque. In arcu cursus euismod quis. Dictum non consectetur a erat nam at lectus urna duis. Facilisi nullam vehicula ipsum a arcu cursus. At tempor commodo ullamcorper a lacus vestibulum sed arcu non. Ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur adipiscing elit pellentesque habitant. Vitae sapien pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus. Eget nullam non nisi est sit amet facilisis. Ipsum consequat nisl vel pretium lectus quam. Elit sed vulputate mi sit amet mauris commodo quis. Pretium fusce id velit ut tortor pretium viverra suspendisse potenti.

A commitment to couture is woven through the fabric of Milan, right down to its name: famed for the production of luxury goods, as long ago as the 1500s it inspired the old English word ‘milaner’, meaning ‘fine wares’. Five hundred years on and the capital of Lombardy remains true to its moniker. It’s home to the great and the good of the world’s fashion houses and, since 1958, an eponymous semi-annual fashion week.

In spring 2003, Naomi Campbell and Linda Evangelista were showcasing collections united by bold colours but unusually polarised in their offering. Across town at the San Siro, life was imitating art. There was nothing subtle about the kits as the star-studded teams of AC Milan and Inter knelt down to face the explosion of pre-match flashbulbs ahead of an historic clash in their Champions League semi-final. Both wore traditional colours: Milan in the red and black they have sported since 1899 and Inter in black and blue, the latter chosen because it was deemed opposite to red. The brightness of the primary colours was turned up to 11 in both cases.

Read the full story
Sign up now to get access to this and every premium feature on Champions Journal. You will also get access to member-only competitions and offers. And you get all of that completely free!

The cut was very much of its time. Men’s fashion in the early 2000s was all about baggy clothes – everything was oversized. When Andriy Shevchenko sprinted towards the bench after scoring the first goal of the tie, just before half-time in the ‘away’ second leg, his outstretched arms revealed so much material that you half expected him to take flight. Obafemi Martins’ acrobatic celebration (front handspring, five somersaults) following his late equaliser was all the more impressive because of his voluminous shirt; featuring an electric yellow trim, it was wrapped around his face for most of it. The V-neck offered little resistance.

Alas, Martins’ goal wasn’t enough for the Nerazzurri, who were ultimately edged out on away goals. Instead it was the Milan side of Paolo Maldini, Alessandro Nesta and Andrea Pirlo (three men who could have graced any catwalk) that advanced to the Old Trafford final. There they saw off Juventus, resplendent in black and white. Safe to say that Milan earned their stripes that season.We focus on the 2003 semi-final between two teams who call a fashion capital home

A commitment to couture is woven through the fabric of Milan, right down to its name: famed for the production of luxury goods, as long ago as the 1500s it inspired the old English word ‘milaner’, meaning ‘fine wares’. Five hundred years on and the capital of Lombardy remains true to its moniker. It’s home to the great and the good of the world’s fashion houses and, since 1958, an eponymous semi-annual fashion week.

In spring 2003, Naomi Campbell and Linda Evangelista were showcasing collections united by bold colours but unusually polarised in their offering. Across town at the San Siro, life was imitating art. There was nothing subtle about the kits as the star-studded teams of AC Milan and Inter knelt down to face the explosion of pre-match flashbulbs ahead of an historic clash in their Champions League semi-final. Both wore traditional colours: Milan in the red and black they have sported since 1899 and Inter in black and blue, the latter chosen because it was deemed opposite to red. The brightness of the primary colours was turned up to 11 in both cases.

Penalty Pedigree

Etiam erat velit scelerisque in dictum non. Dictum non consectetur a erat nam at. Scelerisque felis imperdiet proin fermentum leo. Nibh tortor id aliquet lectus proin nibh nisl. Nulla at volutpat diam ut venenatis. At urna condimentum mattis pellentesque id nibh tortor id aliquet. Leo a diam sollicitudin tempor id eu nisl nunc mi. Dui vivamus arcu felis bibendum ut. Pharetra convallis posuere morbi leo urna molestie. Adipiscing at in tellus integer feugiat scelerisque. In arcu cursus euismod quis. Dictum non consectetur a erat nam at lectus urna duis. Facilisi nullam vehicula ipsum a arcu cursus. At tempor commodo ullamcorper a lacus vestibulum sed arcu non. Ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur adipiscing elit pellentesque habitant. Vitae sapien pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus. Eget nullam non nisi est sit amet facilisis. Ipsum consequat nisl vel pretium lectus quam. Elit sed vulputate mi sit amet mauris commodo quis. Pretium fusce id velit ut tortor pretium viverra suspendisse potenti.

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