Interview

'I'm just grateful'

Arnaut Danjuma discusses his club’s crunch game against Atalanta, a difficult childhood and life in the yellow of Villarreal

You’re still second in your Champions League group – does the game against Atalanta feel like a mini final?

Yeah, definitely. I’m still confident, with the players that we have, that we can qualify. I wouldn’t go there without the mentality to win. Obviously the loss against Manchester United [on Matchday 5] was a tough pill to swallow, but that’s football. We’ll look back on it, improve and make sure we win the next game. We’re not in a bad position but then again, we need to respect the opposition: Atalanta are a tough side to beat.

You’ve had a great start to the season in the Liga and Champions League with seven goals and three assists. You must be happy with your form?

No, not really. People always get a bit shocked about it – I’m grateful but I’m not satisfied. I’ve had a great start, don’t get me wrong, I have my goals and I have my assists, I’ve been called up for the Dutch national team and scored, and I’m a consistent starting-11 player. But there’s still so much more for me to improve, and there’s so much more to learn – I mean, there’s a lot! I always look back on my games and I know exactly what I did wrong. I’m a bit too harsh on myself. I still expect a lot more than I’ve been doing right now, definitely.

Villarreal put a lot of faith in you by bringing you to the club from Bournemouth.   

I’m just grateful that there is an institution, a club, that is willing to put such an amount of money on the table for someone like me. And it just pushes me into wanting to perform – I want to give them the best Arnaut Danjuma.  

Where does your love for the game come from?  

That’s a very good question. It doesn’t really run in my family to be fair, so it’s a bit of a funny one because normally you see that it can be a family thing. But for me I’ve just been very passionate about football since I was younger. I grew up with a ball, I went everywhere with a ball and I watched football all the time.

But are we right in thinking that you didn’t have the easiest childhood?

Growing up wasn’t that easy for me back in the day; I went through a lot as a kid. But I’m very grateful for that period. It really helped me prove myself as a man from a very young age. Looking back at it, I think it is a positive thing. But going through it when you’re a kid, sometimes you might think it’s a bit negative.  

You were reared in a foster family. What was that experience like?   

Very difficult. Obviously as a child, if you’ve been taken away from your parents it’s never easy. Especially for someone like me. especially in my childhood, where you’re just focused on playing football and going to school. It just hits you from a very young age that life can be a bit unfair every now and then. So, it was a difficult time for me.

What advice would you give to the younger you, or a little boy or girl who finds themselves in a similar situation?   

I think the two things that really helped me get through it, besides football, were my family and my friends. I’m still with the same people from back then. I’d definitely advise everyone to make sure they find a comfortable zone to be in, and surround themselves with people who want the best for them and are beneficial to their success.  

Arnaut Danjuma displays his 'Cobra' celebration after scoring.


When you joined the PSV Eindhoven academy, how was it to be denied a contract?   

It was tough. You go to the club with the idea of trying to achieve a contract one day and then if you don’t get one… You see all the other players are slowly getting their contracts, slowly getting their cars, slowly getting their houses, slowly getting everything and building their lives. Other players drove; I took the train. They wore the newest brands; I didn’t. Stuff like that. It hurt back then, definitely.  

Then you joined NEC Nijmegen and were approached by Adrie Bogers. How instrumental was he in your career?   

I think he was the first coach who not only helped me on the pitch but off it as well. That really made me take the next step in my career because the moment I met him that season, my career took off. He genuinely believed in me.  

And from one coach to another: what’s it been like working with Unai Emery?   

He is the key to our success, and I genuinely mean that. The way he analyses the game, the way he helps me perform in the game, how he’s busy with me in training, strategically, tactically... everything. You can just see he is built differently. He is a massive piece of our success and he is the backbone of Villareal. I’m very fortunate to work with him and one of the reasons I really wanted to join Villareal was because he is the coach. So for me, working with Unai Emery on a daily basis is a privilege – 100 per cent.

You’re still second in your Champions League group – does the game against Atalanta feel like a mini final?

Yeah, definitely. I’m still confident, with the players that we have, that we can qualify. I wouldn’t go there without the mentality to win. Obviously the loss against Manchester United [on Matchday 5] was a tough pill to swallow, but that’s football. We’ll look back on it, improve and make sure we win the next game. We’re not in a bad position but then again, we need to respect the opposition: Atalanta are a tough side to beat.

You’ve had a great start to the season in the Liga and Champions League with seven goals and three assists. You must be happy with your form?

No, not really. People always get a bit shocked about it – I’m grateful but I’m not satisfied. I’ve had a great start, don’t get me wrong, I have my goals and I have my assists, I’ve been called up for the Dutch national team and scored, and I’m a consistent starting-11 player. But there’s still so much more for me to improve, and there’s so much more to learn – I mean, there’s a lot! I always look back on my games and I know exactly what I did wrong. I’m a bit too harsh on myself. I still expect a lot more than I’ve been doing right now, definitely.

Villarreal put a lot of faith in you by bringing you to the club from Bournemouth.   

I’m just grateful that there is an institution, a club, that is willing to put such an amount of money on the table for someone like me. And it just pushes me into wanting to perform – I want to give them the best Arnaut Danjuma.  

Where does your love for the game come from?  

That’s a very good question. It doesn’t really run in my family to be fair, so it’s a bit of a funny one because normally you see that it can be a family thing. But for me I’ve just been very passionate about football since I was younger. I grew up with a ball, I went everywhere with a ball and I watched football all the time.

But are we right in thinking that you didn’t have the easiest childhood?

Growing up wasn’t that easy for me back in the day; I went through a lot as a kid. But I’m very grateful for that period. It really helped me prove myself as a man from a very young age. Looking back at it, I think it is a positive thing. But going through it when you’re a kid, sometimes you might think it’s a bit negative.  

You were reared in a foster family. What was that experience like?   

Very difficult. Obviously as a child, if you’ve been taken away from your parents it’s never easy. Especially for someone like me. especially in my childhood, where you’re just focused on playing football and going to school. It just hits you from a very young age that life can be a bit unfair every now and then. So, it was a difficult time for me.

What advice would you give to the younger you, or a little boy or girl who finds themselves in a similar situation?   

I think the two things that really helped me get through it, besides football, were my family and my friends. I’m still with the same people from back then. I’d definitely advise everyone to make sure they find a comfortable zone to be in, and surround themselves with people who want the best for them and are beneficial to their success.  

Arnaut Danjuma displays his 'Cobra' celebration after scoring.


When you joined the PSV Eindhoven academy, how was it to be denied a contract?   

It was tough. You go to the club with the idea of trying to achieve a contract one day and then if you don’t get one… You see all the other players are slowly getting their contracts, slowly getting their cars, slowly getting their houses, slowly getting everything and building their lives. Other players drove; I took the train. They wore the newest brands; I didn’t. Stuff like that. It hurt back then, definitely.  

Then you joined NEC Nijmegen and were approached by Adrie Bogers. How instrumental was he in your career?   

I think he was the first coach who not only helped me on the pitch but off it as well. That really made me take the next step in my career because the moment I met him that season, my career took off. He genuinely believed in me.  

And from one coach to another: what’s it been like working with Unai Emery?   

He is the key to our success, and I genuinely mean that. The way he analyses the game, the way he helps me perform in the game, how he’s busy with me in training, strategically, tactically... everything. You can just see he is built differently. He is a massive piece of our success and he is the backbone of Villareal. I’m very fortunate to work with him and one of the reasons I really wanted to join Villareal was because he is the coach. So for me, working with Unai Emery on a daily basis is a privilege – 100 per cent.

Read the full story
Sign up now to get access to this and every premium feature on Champions Journal. You will also get access to member-only competitions and offers. And you get all of that completely free!

You’re still second in your Champions League group – does the game against Atalanta feel like a mini final?

Yeah, definitely. I’m still confident, with the players that we have, that we can qualify. I wouldn’t go there without the mentality to win. Obviously the loss against Manchester United [on Matchday 5] was a tough pill to swallow, but that’s football. We’ll look back on it, improve and make sure we win the next game. We’re not in a bad position but then again, we need to respect the opposition: Atalanta are a tough side to beat.

You’ve had a great start to the season in the Liga and Champions League with seven goals and three assists. You must be happy with your form?

No, not really. People always get a bit shocked about it – I’m grateful but I’m not satisfied. I’ve had a great start, don’t get me wrong, I have my goals and I have my assists, I’ve been called up for the Dutch national team and scored, and I’m a consistent starting-11 player. But there’s still so much more for me to improve, and there’s so much more to learn – I mean, there’s a lot! I always look back on my games and I know exactly what I did wrong. I’m a bit too harsh on myself. I still expect a lot more than I’ve been doing right now, definitely.

Villarreal put a lot of faith in you by bringing you to the club from Bournemouth.   

I’m just grateful that there is an institution, a club, that is willing to put such an amount of money on the table for someone like me. And it just pushes me into wanting to perform – I want to give them the best Arnaut Danjuma.  

Where does your love for the game come from?  

That’s a very good question. It doesn’t really run in my family to be fair, so it’s a bit of a funny one because normally you see that it can be a family thing. But for me I’ve just been very passionate about football since I was younger. I grew up with a ball, I went everywhere with a ball and I watched football all the time.

But are we right in thinking that you didn’t have the easiest childhood?

Growing up wasn’t that easy for me back in the day; I went through a lot as a kid. But I’m very grateful for that period. It really helped me prove myself as a man from a very young age. Looking back at it, I think it is a positive thing. But going through it when you’re a kid, sometimes you might think it’s a bit negative.  

You were reared in a foster family. What was that experience like?   

Very difficult. Obviously as a child, if you’ve been taken away from your parents it’s never easy. Especially for someone like me. especially in my childhood, where you’re just focused on playing football and going to school. It just hits you from a very young age that life can be a bit unfair every now and then. So, it was a difficult time for me.

What advice would you give to the younger you, or a little boy or girl who finds themselves in a similar situation?   

I think the two things that really helped me get through it, besides football, were my family and my friends. I’m still with the same people from back then. I’d definitely advise everyone to make sure they find a comfortable zone to be in, and surround themselves with people who want the best for them and are beneficial to their success.  

Arnaut Danjuma displays his 'Cobra' celebration after scoring.


When you joined the PSV Eindhoven academy, how was it to be denied a contract?   

It was tough. You go to the club with the idea of trying to achieve a contract one day and then if you don’t get one… You see all the other players are slowly getting their contracts, slowly getting their cars, slowly getting their houses, slowly getting everything and building their lives. Other players drove; I took the train. They wore the newest brands; I didn’t. Stuff like that. It hurt back then, definitely.  

Then you joined NEC Nijmegen and were approached by Adrie Bogers. How instrumental was he in your career?   

I think he was the first coach who not only helped me on the pitch but off it as well. That really made me take the next step in my career because the moment I met him that season, my career took off. He genuinely believed in me.  

And from one coach to another: what’s it been like working with Unai Emery?   

He is the key to our success, and I genuinely mean that. The way he analyses the game, the way he helps me perform in the game, how he’s busy with me in training, strategically, tactically... everything. You can just see he is built differently. He is a massive piece of our success and he is the backbone of Villareal. I’m very fortunate to work with him and one of the reasons I really wanted to join Villareal was because he is the coach. So for me, working with Unai Emery on a daily basis is a privilege – 100 per cent.

'I'm just grateful'
Interview

'I'm just grateful'

Arnaut Danjuma discusses his club’s crunch game against Atalanta, a difficult childhood and life in the yellow of Villarreal

You’re still second in your Champions League group – does the game against Atalanta feel like a mini final?

Yeah, definitely. I’m still confident, with the players that we have, that we can qualify. I wouldn’t go there without the mentality to win. Obviously the loss against Manchester United [on Matchday 5] was a tough pill to swallow, but that’s football. We’ll look back on it, improve and make sure we win the next game. We’re not in a bad position but then again, we need to respect the opposition: Atalanta are a tough side to beat.

You’ve had a great start to the season in the Liga and Champions League with seven goals and three assists. You must be happy with your form?

No, not really. People always get a bit shocked about it – I’m grateful but I’m not satisfied. I’ve had a great start, don’t get me wrong, I have my goals and I have my assists, I’ve been called up for the Dutch national team and scored, and I’m a consistent starting-11 player. But there’s still so much more for me to improve, and there’s so much more to learn – I mean, there’s a lot! I always look back on my games and I know exactly what I did wrong. I’m a bit too harsh on myself. I still expect a lot more than I’ve been doing right now, definitely.

Villarreal put a lot of faith in you by bringing you to the club from Bournemouth.   

I’m just grateful that there is an institution, a club, that is willing to put such an amount of money on the table for someone like me. And it just pushes me into wanting to perform – I want to give them the best Arnaut Danjuma.  

Where does your love for the game come from?  

That’s a very good question. It doesn’t really run in my family to be fair, so it’s a bit of a funny one because normally you see that it can be a family thing. But for me I’ve just been very passionate about football since I was younger. I grew up with a ball, I went everywhere with a ball and I watched football all the time.

But are we right in thinking that you didn’t have the easiest childhood?

Growing up wasn’t that easy for me back in the day; I went through a lot as a kid. But I’m very grateful for that period. It really helped me prove myself as a man from a very young age. Looking back at it, I think it is a positive thing. But going through it when you’re a kid, sometimes you might think it’s a bit negative.  

You were reared in a foster family. What was that experience like?   

Very difficult. Obviously as a child, if you’ve been taken away from your parents it’s never easy. Especially for someone like me. especially in my childhood, where you’re just focused on playing football and going to school. It just hits you from a very young age that life can be a bit unfair every now and then. So, it was a difficult time for me.

What advice would you give to the younger you, or a little boy or girl who finds themselves in a similar situation?   

I think the two things that really helped me get through it, besides football, were my family and my friends. I’m still with the same people from back then. I’d definitely advise everyone to make sure they find a comfortable zone to be in, and surround themselves with people who want the best for them and are beneficial to their success.  

Arnaut Danjuma displays his 'Cobra' celebration after scoring.


When you joined the PSV Eindhoven academy, how was it to be denied a contract?   

It was tough. You go to the club with the idea of trying to achieve a contract one day and then if you don’t get one… You see all the other players are slowly getting their contracts, slowly getting their cars, slowly getting their houses, slowly getting everything and building their lives. Other players drove; I took the train. They wore the newest brands; I didn’t. Stuff like that. It hurt back then, definitely.  

Then you joined NEC Nijmegen and were approached by Adrie Bogers. How instrumental was he in your career?   

I think he was the first coach who not only helped me on the pitch but off it as well. That really made me take the next step in my career because the moment I met him that season, my career took off. He genuinely believed in me.  

And from one coach to another: what’s it been like working with Unai Emery?   

He is the key to our success, and I genuinely mean that. The way he analyses the game, the way he helps me perform in the game, how he’s busy with me in training, strategically, tactically... everything. You can just see he is built differently. He is a massive piece of our success and he is the backbone of Villareal. I’m very fortunate to work with him and one of the reasons I really wanted to join Villareal was because he is the coach. So for me, working with Unai Emery on a daily basis is a privilege – 100 per cent.

Penalty Pedigree

Etiam erat velit scelerisque in dictum non. Dictum non consectetur a erat nam at. Scelerisque felis imperdiet proin fermentum leo. Nibh tortor id aliquet lectus proin nibh nisl. Nulla at volutpat diam ut venenatis. At urna condimentum mattis pellentesque id nibh tortor id aliquet. Leo a diam sollicitudin tempor id eu nisl nunc mi. Dui vivamus arcu felis bibendum ut. Pharetra convallis posuere morbi leo urna molestie. Adipiscing at in tellus integer feugiat scelerisque. In arcu cursus euismod quis. Dictum non consectetur a erat nam at lectus urna duis. Facilisi nullam vehicula ipsum a arcu cursus. At tempor commodo ullamcorper a lacus vestibulum sed arcu non. Ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur adipiscing elit pellentesque habitant. Vitae sapien pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus. Eget nullam non nisi est sit amet facilisis. Ipsum consequat nisl vel pretium lectus quam. Elit sed vulputate mi sit amet mauris commodo quis. Pretium fusce id velit ut tortor pretium viverra suspendisse potenti.

You’re still second in your Champions League group – does the game against Atalanta feel like a mini final?

Yeah, definitely. I’m still confident, with the players that we have, that we can qualify. I wouldn’t go there without the mentality to win. Obviously the loss against Manchester United [on Matchday 5] was a tough pill to swallow, but that’s football. We’ll look back on it, improve and make sure we win the next game. We’re not in a bad position but then again, we need to respect the opposition: Atalanta are a tough side to beat.

You’ve had a great start to the season in the Liga and Champions League with seven goals and three assists. You must be happy with your form?

No, not really. People always get a bit shocked about it – I’m grateful but I’m not satisfied. I’ve had a great start, don’t get me wrong, I have my goals and I have my assists, I’ve been called up for the Dutch national team and scored, and I’m a consistent starting-11 player. But there’s still so much more for me to improve, and there’s so much more to learn – I mean, there’s a lot! I always look back on my games and I know exactly what I did wrong. I’m a bit too harsh on myself. I still expect a lot more than I’ve been doing right now, definitely.

Villarreal put a lot of faith in you by bringing you to the club from Bournemouth.   

I’m just grateful that there is an institution, a club, that is willing to put such an amount of money on the table for someone like me. And it just pushes me into wanting to perform – I want to give them the best Arnaut Danjuma.  

Where does your love for the game come from?  

That’s a very good question. It doesn’t really run in my family to be fair, so it’s a bit of a funny one because normally you see that it can be a family thing. But for me I’ve just been very passionate about football since I was younger. I grew up with a ball, I went everywhere with a ball and I watched football all the time.

But are we right in thinking that you didn’t have the easiest childhood?

Growing up wasn’t that easy for me back in the day; I went through a lot as a kid. But I’m very grateful for that period. It really helped me prove myself as a man from a very young age. Looking back at it, I think it is a positive thing. But going through it when you’re a kid, sometimes you might think it’s a bit negative.  

You were reared in a foster family. What was that experience like?   

Very difficult. Obviously as a child, if you’ve been taken away from your parents it’s never easy. Especially for someone like me. especially in my childhood, where you’re just focused on playing football and going to school. It just hits you from a very young age that life can be a bit unfair every now and then. So, it was a difficult time for me.

What advice would you give to the younger you, or a little boy or girl who finds themselves in a similar situation?   

I think the two things that really helped me get through it, besides football, were my family and my friends. I’m still with the same people from back then. I’d definitely advise everyone to make sure they find a comfortable zone to be in, and surround themselves with people who want the best for them and are beneficial to their success.  

Arnaut Danjuma displays his 'Cobra' celebration after scoring.


When you joined the PSV Eindhoven academy, how was it to be denied a contract?   

It was tough. You go to the club with the idea of trying to achieve a contract one day and then if you don’t get one… You see all the other players are slowly getting their contracts, slowly getting their cars, slowly getting their houses, slowly getting everything and building their lives. Other players drove; I took the train. They wore the newest brands; I didn’t. Stuff like that. It hurt back then, definitely.  

Then you joined NEC Nijmegen and were approached by Adrie Bogers. How instrumental was he in your career?   

I think he was the first coach who not only helped me on the pitch but off it as well. That really made me take the next step in my career because the moment I met him that season, my career took off. He genuinely believed in me.  

And from one coach to another: what’s it been like working with Unai Emery?   

He is the key to our success, and I genuinely mean that. The way he analyses the game, the way he helps me perform in the game, how he’s busy with me in training, strategically, tactically... everything. You can just see he is built differently. He is a massive piece of our success and he is the backbone of Villareal. I’m very fortunate to work with him and one of the reasons I really wanted to join Villareal was because he is the coach. So for me, working with Unai Emery on a daily basis is a privilege – 100 per cent.

Read the full story
Sign up now to get access to this and every premium feature on Champions Journal. You will also get access to member-only competitions and offers. And you get all of that completely free!

You’re still second in your Champions League group – does the game against Atalanta feel like a mini final?

Yeah, definitely. I’m still confident, with the players that we have, that we can qualify. I wouldn’t go there without the mentality to win. Obviously the loss against Manchester United [on Matchday 5] was a tough pill to swallow, but that’s football. We’ll look back on it, improve and make sure we win the next game. We’re not in a bad position but then again, we need to respect the opposition: Atalanta are a tough side to beat.

You’ve had a great start to the season in the Liga and Champions League with seven goals and three assists. You must be happy with your form?

No, not really. People always get a bit shocked about it – I’m grateful but I’m not satisfied. I’ve had a great start, don’t get me wrong, I have my goals and I have my assists, I’ve been called up for the Dutch national team and scored, and I’m a consistent starting-11 player. But there’s still so much more for me to improve, and there’s so much more to learn – I mean, there’s a lot! I always look back on my games and I know exactly what I did wrong. I’m a bit too harsh on myself. I still expect a lot more than I’ve been doing right now, definitely.

Villarreal put a lot of faith in you by bringing you to the club from Bournemouth.   

I’m just grateful that there is an institution, a club, that is willing to put such an amount of money on the table for someone like me. And it just pushes me into wanting to perform – I want to give them the best Arnaut Danjuma.  

Where does your love for the game come from?  

That’s a very good question. It doesn’t really run in my family to be fair, so it’s a bit of a funny one because normally you see that it can be a family thing. But for me I’ve just been very passionate about football since I was younger. I grew up with a ball, I went everywhere with a ball and I watched football all the time.

But are we right in thinking that you didn’t have the easiest childhood?

Growing up wasn’t that easy for me back in the day; I went through a lot as a kid. But I’m very grateful for that period. It really helped me prove myself as a man from a very young age. Looking back at it, I think it is a positive thing. But going through it when you’re a kid, sometimes you might think it’s a bit negative.  

You were reared in a foster family. What was that experience like?   

Very difficult. Obviously as a child, if you’ve been taken away from your parents it’s never easy. Especially for someone like me. especially in my childhood, where you’re just focused on playing football and going to school. It just hits you from a very young age that life can be a bit unfair every now and then. So, it was a difficult time for me.

What advice would you give to the younger you, or a little boy or girl who finds themselves in a similar situation?   

I think the two things that really helped me get through it, besides football, were my family and my friends. I’m still with the same people from back then. I’d definitely advise everyone to make sure they find a comfortable zone to be in, and surround themselves with people who want the best for them and are beneficial to their success.  

Arnaut Danjuma displays his 'Cobra' celebration after scoring.


When you joined the PSV Eindhoven academy, how was it to be denied a contract?   

It was tough. You go to the club with the idea of trying to achieve a contract one day and then if you don’t get one… You see all the other players are slowly getting their contracts, slowly getting their cars, slowly getting their houses, slowly getting everything and building their lives. Other players drove; I took the train. They wore the newest brands; I didn’t. Stuff like that. It hurt back then, definitely.  

Then you joined NEC Nijmegen and were approached by Adrie Bogers. How instrumental was he in your career?   

I think he was the first coach who not only helped me on the pitch but off it as well. That really made me take the next step in my career because the moment I met him that season, my career took off. He genuinely believed in me.  

And from one coach to another: what’s it been like working with Unai Emery?   

He is the key to our success, and I genuinely mean that. The way he analyses the game, the way he helps me perform in the game, how he’s busy with me in training, strategically, tactically... everything. You can just see he is built differently. He is a massive piece of our success and he is the backbone of Villareal. I’m very fortunate to work with him and one of the reasons I really wanted to join Villareal was because he is the coach. So for me, working with Unai Emery on a daily basis is a privilege – 100 per cent.

Penalty Pedigree

Etiam erat velit scelerisque in dictum non. Dictum non consectetur a erat nam at. Scelerisque felis imperdiet proin fermentum leo. Nibh tortor id aliquet lectus proin nibh nisl. Nulla at volutpat diam ut venenatis. At urna condimentum mattis pellentesque id nibh tortor id aliquet. Leo a diam sollicitudin tempor id eu nisl nunc mi. Dui vivamus arcu felis bibendum ut. Pharetra convallis posuere morbi leo urna molestie. Adipiscing at in tellus integer feugiat scelerisque. In arcu cursus euismod quis. Dictum non consectetur a erat nam at lectus urna duis. Facilisi nullam vehicula ipsum a arcu cursus. At tempor commodo ullamcorper a lacus vestibulum sed arcu non. Ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur adipiscing elit pellentesque habitant. Vitae sapien pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus. Eget nullam non nisi est sit amet facilisis. Ipsum consequat nisl vel pretium lectus quam. Elit sed vulputate mi sit amet mauris commodo quis. Pretium fusce id velit ut tortor pretium viverra suspendisse potenti.

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